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Full text of "Annual report"

ANNUAL REPORT 

1983 




TOWN OF IPSWICH 



About the cover: 

Photo is of the reenactment (held April 30, 1983) of the first settlers 

landing in Ipswich. 

(Photo by Jonathan M. Whitmore/lpswich Chronicle) 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN: 

Seated: Lawrence J. Pszenny 

Standing (l-r): William E. George; David S. Player, Jr., Chairman; Arthur 

S. LeClair; Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

1983 ANNUAL REPORT 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 2 

April 04 , 1 983 Annual Town Meeting 5 

Operating Budget 14 

Board of Selectmen 34 

Town Manager 3^ 

Assessor ' s Office 35 

Building Inspector 35 

Cemeteries , Parks and Buildings Department 36 

Civil Defense 36 

Commuter Rail Committee 37 

Conservation Commission 37 

Council on Aging 38 

Dog and Animal Control Officer 38 

Electric Department 39 

Fire Department -. 39 

Government Study Committee 40 

Hall-Haskell House Committee 41 

Harbormaster 41 

Health Department 42 

Historical Commission 43 

Housing Authority 43 

Industrial Development Commission 44 

Library 45 

Mosquito Control 46 

Planning Board 47 

Police Department 47 

Public Works Department 48 

Recreation-Youth Department 50 

School Committee 51 

Superintendent of Schools 51 

High School 52 

Ralph C . Whipple Memorial School 53 

Paul F . Doyon Memorial School 53 

Winthrop School 54 

Department of Special Education 54 

Shellfish Department 55 

350th Anniversary Committee 55 

Town Clerk 56 

Town Counsel 57 

Treasurer-Collector 57 

Veterans ' Services 58 

Water/Sewer Departments 58 

Water Supply Committee 60 

Waterways Advisory Committee 61 

Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School 61 

Zoning Board of Appeals 62 

Financial Statement-Fiscal Year Ending June 30 , 1983 63 

Revenue Sharing/Handicapped Regulations 99 

Tips For A Healthy Septic System 99 

-1- 



1983 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



CONSTABLE 
Joyce Gysan 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Arthur B. Weagle, Ch 
Arthur Goodfellow 
Stanley Eustace 
Jacqueline A. Boch 
Leland Schoen /State 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Marjorie Robie, Ch 
Judith Mulholland 
Lawrence Seidler 
Mar got N. Sherwood 
Thomas B. Emery 
Joanne Caccamise 
Thomas A. Elliott 



ELECTED 










FINANCE COMMITTEE 




1984 


E2 


Elected At Town Meeting 






Walter J. Pojasek 


1984 






Edward L. Nagus 


1985 


1986 




Edward A. Wegzyn 


1986 


1984 


03 


Appointed By Moderator 




1985 




Clarence S. Dupray 


1984 


1988 




William Craft, Ch 


1985 


1986 




Alice Shur cliff 


1986 




S 


Appointed By Selectmen 








John Markos 


1984 


1984 




Peter Maistrellis 


1985 


1984 




James D. Smyth 


1986 


1984 








1985 


E 


BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




1985 




David S. Player, Jr., Ch 


1986 


1986 




Arthur S. LeClair 


1984 


1986 




Lawrence J. Pszenny 


1984 






William E. George 


1985 






Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 


1986 



E 


TOWN MODERATOR 
A. James Grimes 




1984 


Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 


1986 


S1 


ACCOUNTANT 
Robert H. Leet 


APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 

M1 POLICE CHIEF 
1985 Armand R. Brouillette 




M1 


ASSESSOR 

Frank J. Ragonese 




1984 


M1 PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 
Armand T. Michaud 




M1 


BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Charles W. Turner 




1984 


M1 RECREATION DIRECTOR 
Elizabeth Dorman 


1984 


M1 


CEMETERY/PARKS SUPERINTENDENT 
James E. Graff urn 




M1 SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 
Philip Kent 


1986 



M1 DOG OFFICER/ANIMAL INSPECTOR 

Harry W. Leno, Jr. 1984 

M1 ENGINEER 

James E. Chase 

M1 FIRE CHIEF 

Edwin R. Emerson 

M1 HARBORMASTER 

Michael Holland 1984 

M1 HEALTH AGENT 

Joseph Giancola 1984 

M1 LIBRARIAN 
Eleanor Gaunt 



6 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

M1 TOWN CLERK 

Isobel N. Coulombe 1984 

M1 TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles C. Dalton 1984 

S TOWN MANAGER 

George E. Howe 1986 

S1 TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

George C. Mourikas 1986 

M1 DEPUTY COLLECTOR 
William Handren 



M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Frank J. Ragonese 
John Moberger 
John D. Heaphy 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

S CATV COMMITTEE 

1984 George E. Howe 

1985 Glenn Bay ley 
1986 



1984 
1984 



-2- 



M CEMETERY & PARKS COMMISSION 

Kenneth L. Goodhue, Ch 1985 

Nicholas Markos 1984 

Gordon C. Player 1986 

M CIVIL DEFENSE 

John R. Harrigan, Dir 1984 

David Clements, Asst 1984 

S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 

Dorcas Rice, Ch 1984 

James Berry 1984 

Wayne King 1984 

Vivian Endicott 1984 

Joseph Carlin 1984 

William Varrell 1984 

James McC. Hayward 1984 

M5 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Lillian V. North, Ch 1984 

George R. Hovey 1984 

Edward Sukach 1984 

David Crestin 1985 

Costos Tsoutsouris 1985 

William Barton 1986 

Nora J. Mitchell 1986 

S COUNCIL ON AGING 

Winfred Hardy, Ch 1986 

Helen Drenth 1984 

Gertrude Emery 1984 

Charles Sheppard 1985 

Thomas Emery 1985 

Arthur Goodfellow 1986 

Marion Rogers 1986 

M ELECTRIC SURVEY ASSISTANTS COMMITTEE 

Philip Rhodes, Ch 1985 

Jeffrey J. LaMarca 1984 

Thomas A. Ercoline 1984 

John T. Farady 1984 

Lawrence Sweetser 1985 

Robert W. Schubert, Jr. 1986 



S GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



S ENERGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Niels Knakkergaard 
Bruce Paul 
Peter Williamson 

S FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 
Natalie Gaynor, Ch 
Rev. Merle Pimentel 
Thomas L. Moscarillo 
Tone Kenney 
Sara O'Connor 
Jacqueline A. Boch 
Ruth Edmonds 
Stephanie Nagle 
Susan Nelson 
Nancy Carter 
Arthur B. Weagle 



1984 
1984 
1984 



1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 



Constance Surpitski , Ch 


1984 


Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne 


1984 


Steven A. Walsh 


1984 


Douglas S. Laterowicz 


1984 


03 HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 




Vivian Endicott, Ch 


1984 


Theresa Stephens 


1984 


Helen M. Burr 


1984 


Alice Keenan 


1984 


Cathleen R. McGinley 


1984 


M BOARD OF HEALTH 




Constance Surpitski, Ch 


1986 


David Carleton 


1984 


Kenneth L. Zinn, M.D. 


1985 


M5 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 




Mary P. Conley, Ch 


1985 


Barbara C. Ember ly 


1984 


George R. Mathey 


1984 


Faith L. Bryan 


1984 


Lovell Thompson 


1985 


Alice Keenan 


1985 


Ruthanne C. Rogers 


1986 


M INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMI 


SSION 


Paul R. Beswick, Ch 


1988 


Peter Williamson 


1984 


Alfred Castantini 


1984 


Alfred Benedetto 


1984 


Bruce F. Paul 


1985 


Philip Lang 


1985 


Stephen Dietch 


1986 


Warren P. Russo 


1987 


James M. Nelson 


1987 


S INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING 


AUTHORITY 




George E. Howe, Ch 


1986 


Richard Emery 


1984 


Loretta Dietch 


1985 


James C. Lahar 


1987 


F. Dale Vincent 


1988 


S IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 




Janet T. Craft, Ch 


1984 


Barbara King 


1984 


Barbara J. Waitt 


1984 


Helen Badenhausen 


1984 


Marion W. Swan 


1985 


Jane E. Reiman 


1985 


Helen Eames 


1985 


Charles Dort 


1985 


Peter M. Juntunen 


1985 


Bette L. Siegel 


1985 



-3- 



S LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Crocker Snow, Sr., Ch 
Hubert A. Johnson 
Steven M. Brody 
Alice Keenan 
Phyllis E. Bruce 
Kathryn G. Klinger 
Virginia Jackson 
Louise Sweet ser 
Harris Smith 

M PLANNING BOARD 

James M. Warner, Ch 
Wayne G. King 
Barbara F. Ostberg 
Albert Harkness III 
Patrick J. McNally 

M RECREATION COMMITTEE 
Kenneth Spellraan, Ch 
Mark J. Perrone 
Douglas Woodworth 
Cathleen McGinley 
Timothy Bishop 
Charles Surpitski 
Linda M. Murphy 

S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Thelma Cummings 

Marian H. Reedy 

John Kobos 
M1 Isobel N. Coulombe, Clerk 

S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 
Thomas Dorman, Ch 
Joanne D. Soffron 
Alice H. Thanos 
Andrew Gianakakis 
Forrest W. MacGilvary 
Fred Wegzyn 
Robert Kneeland 
Warren Jepson 
Anthony Christopher 

S TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 
Elton McCausland, Ch 
Sturgis P. Papagiotis 
Peter Owsiak 

S WATER SUPPLY COMMITTEE 
James Engel, Ch 
Robert Comeau 
Scott Greeley 
Robert 0. Butcher 
James Foley 
Henry Chouinard 
Gerald Priestman 
Joyce Kippin 
Nora J. Mitchell 



1986 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1985 
1985 
1985 
1986 
1986 



1986 
1984 
1985 
1987 
1988 



1985 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1986 



1984 
1985 
1986 
1984 



1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 



1986 
1984 
1985 



1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 
1984 



WATERWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

George C. Scott, Jr., Ch 1984 

Marion Swan 1984 

William A. Barton 1984 

Robert S. Sherman 1984 

Warren P. Russo 1984 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Allen G. Swan, Ch 1988 

William J. Murphy 1984 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 1985 

Mary E. Fosdick 1986 

James Theodosopoulos 1987 

John R. Verani, Alt 1984 

Jeffrey Simon, Alt 1984 



M BELL RINGER 

Stanley Eustace 1984 

M GAS INSPECTOR 

A.N.D. Hyde C.S. 

M INSECT PEST CONTROL SUPERINTENDENT 
Armand T. Michaud 1984 



M PARKING CLERK 
William Handren 

M PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
A.N.D. Hyde 



1984 



C.S. 



M ALTERNATE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

David W. French C.S. 

M SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Normand J. Bedard 1984 



M WIRING INSPECTOR 
Raymond Budzianowski 



1984 



E Elected 

S Appointed By Board of Selectmen 

M Appointed By Town Manager 

Other 

1 Supervised By Town Manager 

2 Elected At Town Meeting 

3 Appointed By Moderator 

4 General Laws 

5 Confirmed By Board of Selectmen 

6 Appointed By School Committee 



-4- 



ANNUAL TOWN FETING 
Ipswich High School April 04, 1983 

ESSEX, ss. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby directed to 

notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town Affairs, 

to meet at the Ipswich High School, in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE FOURTH DAY OF APRIL, 1983 
at 7:30, o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, 
viz: 

There was not a quorum present at 7:30 p.m. and the Moderator asked for a motion 
to postpone the opening for 15 minutes. At 7:45 p.m. the quorum was present (the 
final count was 695) and Moderator James Grimes called the Meeting to order. 
Outgoing Chairman of the School Committee George Jewell led the Pledge of Alle- 
giance to the Flag. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: Roger Barous, Mary McLoud, Stanley 
Eustace, George Hovey, Sara O'Connor, Frances McSweeney. 

Article 1 . To fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers. 

Selectmen Chairman Lawrence Pszenny moved that the salary and compensation of all 
elected Town Officers be fixed as in the 1983-84 budget. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 2. To choose the following officers, viz: Constable for one (1) year; 
Moderator for one (1) year; two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years; two (2) Mem- 
bers of the School Committee for three (3) years; and one (1) Member of the Hous- 
ing Authority for five (5) years. 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling places 
as follows: Precinct 1 Agawam Village, County Road; Precinct 2 Winthrop School, 
Central Street; Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street; Precinct 4 Ipswich 
Housing Authority Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue; on Monday, April 11, 1983- 
The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m.; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town choose the following officers, viz: Constable 
for one (1) year; Moderator for one (1) year; two (2) Selectmen for three (3) 
years; two (2) members of the School Committee for three (3) years; and one (1) 
member of the Housing Authority for five (5) years. The above officers to be 
voted on one ballot at their respective polling places as follows: Precinct 1 - 
Agawam Village, County Road; Precinct 2 - Winthrop School, Central Street; Pre- 
cinct 3 - Ipswich High School, High Street; Precinct 4 - Ipswich Housing Author- 
ity Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue; on Monday, April 11, 1983. The polls shall 
open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded and voted unanimously by voice vote that non-voting mem- 
bers be allowed in to watch the proceedings. 

Article 3« To choose one (1) Member of the Finance Committee for three (3) 
years. 

David Player moved that Edward Wegzyn be nominated to the Finance Committee to 
serve for three years. Seconded. Dale Vincent moved that Mickey Williamson be 

-5- 



nominated to the Finance Committee to serve for three years. Seconded. Nomina- 
tions closed, seconded, carried on voice vote. On a hand count, Mr. Wegzyn was 
nominated, 332 to 216. 

Article 4. To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee and the 
School Committee relative to the School Department budget and to raise, appropri- 
ate, and transfer money for the ensuing year's operations; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Walter Pojasek of the Finance Committee moved that the sum of $4,858,296 be 
raised and appropriated for the School Department budget: 

For the School Department budget $4,858,296 

Transfer from Available Funds 

Feoffees of the Grammar School 4,000 

Net to be Raised and Assessed $4,854,296. 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously supported. Superintendent Richard 
Thompson, George Jewell spoke in favor, and Mr. Jewell moved that the motion be 
amended by substituting the sum of $4,873,296 for the sum of $4,858,296 in two 
places in the foregoing motion and that the total sum to be raised and assessed 
is increased to $4,869,296. Seconded. Discussion on Finance Committee meeting 
at which the members agreed with the School Committee figures, but took another 
vote later with no School Committee members present and approved the lower fig- 
ure. The question was moved, seconded, failed on voice vote. Lawrence Siedler, 
Sara O'Connor, Thomas Emery spoke for School Committee, Clarence Dupray for 
Finance Committee. Voice vote carried on the amendment; the main motion as 
amended carried on a voice vote. 

Mr. Emery reminded voters that Mr. Jewell was not a candidate for re-election and 
asked that they give him a round of applause; so done. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
to cover the Town's share of the annual operating and debt service expenses of 
the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Frank Scanzani of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School Commit- 
tee moved that the Town vote to approve, raise and appropriate in accordance with 
Chapter 71, Section 16B, the sum of $112,401 to cover the Town's share of the 
annual operating expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District, and that the Town vote to approve the operating budget for Fis- 
cal 1984 for the Whittier District in the amount of $6,755,378. Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen, Finance Committee approved. Motion carried unanimously on voice 
vote. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote: 

( 1 ) To raise and appropriate a sum of money and/or transfer from available funds 
or to authorize an expenditure from the Federal General Revenue Sharing account 
of a sum of money to pay unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining 
unpaid; and 

(2) To raise and appropriate a sum of money and/or to appropriate a sum of money 
from the Water Division surplus account to pay any Water Division unpaid bills 
incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; or to take any other action rel- 
ative thereto. 

William George moved that the Town vote (1) to transfer from free cash the sum of 
$1,890.71 to pay unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid, 
viz: Harbormaster J. Costoplus (FY82) Mileage $ 32.13 

Electric Department (FY82) 67.07 

-6- 



Conservation Comm. Maranatha Printing (FY81) 44.25 

Animal Control High Street Motors (FY82) 4.00 

Electric Department (FY82) 1.05 

Fire Department Robert Gambale (Wages/EMT) (FY82) 71.61 

School Department Family Practice Associates (FY82) 208.00 

Silver Burdette Company (FY82) 9.72 

William Quigley (FY82) 73-90 

Lowell Medical Company (FY82) 72.98 

Harvard University-Gutman Library (FY82) 24.81 

Barrons Education (FY82) 51.88 

Legal Department Charles C. Dalton (TAP-D) (FY82) 475.00 

Charles C. Dalton (Bowen House) (FY82) 650.00 

Recreation Dept. Electric Department (FY82) 104 . 31 

$1,890.71; 

and (2) to transfer from Water Division Surplus the sum of $338.74 to pay unpaid 
bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid, viz: 

Water Department James P. McCormack (FY82) $ 36.60 

Means Chevrolet (FY82) 57.00 

Electric Department (FY82) 245.14 

$ 338.74. 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
and /or to transfer a sum of money from available funds or from the Federal Gener- 
al Revenue Sharing Account to fund supplements to the Town and School Operating 
Account to fund supplements to the Town and School operating budgets for FY83; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. 

Arthur LeClair moved that the Town vote (1) to transfer from free cash the sum of 
$69,393.17 to fund supplements to the Town Operating Budget for FY83, viz: 
Police Department $37,632.00 Wages 
Fire Department 30,442.00 Wages and Uniforms 
Police Department 1,319.17 Expenses (J. Souter medical bills); 

and (2) to transfer from the insurance account the sum of $8,270 to fund a sup- 
plement to the Reserve Fund for FY83. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time, in antici- 
pation of the revenue for the financial year beginning July 01, 1983, and ending 
June 30, 1984, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a per- 
iod of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

David Player moved that the Town vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time, in antici- 
pation of the revenue for the financial year beginning July 01 , 1983 and ending 
June 30, 1984, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a per- 
iod of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Com- 
mittee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the current expenses of the Water Division, same to be paid for by revenues 

-7- 



of the Water Division during FY84, and to transfer a sum of money from the sur- 
plus account to Water, Plant and Investment; or to take any other action relative 
thereto . 

William George moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$307,965 for the current expenses of the Water Division, the same to be paid for 
by revenues of the Water Division during Fiscal Year 1984, and to transfer the 
sum of $24,290 from the Water Division Surplus Account to Water Plant and Invest- 
ment. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will approve the filing of a petition by the 
Selectmen with the General Court under the provisions of Article II Section 8 of 
the Articles of Amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth, asking the 
General Court to enact a special act amending Chapter 620 of the Acts of 1966, 
the Charter of the Town, by deleting Section 2 of said chapter in its entirety 
and by substituting therefor the following new Section 2: 
"Section 2. Board of Selectmen: The Board of Selectmen shall consist of five 
(5) members, each to be eleted by official ballot by the qualified voters of the 
Town at the Annual Town Election and each to hold a two (2) year term of office. 
Each precinct shall elect a Selectman whose legal residence is within that pre- 
cinct. One (1) Selectman-at-large shall be elected by the voters of the entire 
town, all precinct candidates being eligible. If the elected Selectman-at-large 
receives a majority of votes in his or her precinct, the candidate receiving the 
next highest vote shall represent the precinct. The Selectman-at-large by virtue 
of popular vote, shall serve as chairman. Selectmen holding office at the time 
of the enactment of this section by the General Court shall remain in office 
until the next annual town election;" or to take any other action relative there- 
to. (By Petition) 

Charles Wayne: The purpose of this Article is to propose that the Town vote to 
amend the Town Charter as follows: Delete Section 2 in its entirety and substi- 
tute the following: Section 2. Board of Selectmen - The Board of Selectmen 
shall consist of five (5) members, each to be elected by official ballot by the 
qualified voters of the town at the annual town election and each to hold a two 
(2) year term of office. Each precinct shall elect a Selectman whose legal resi- 
dence is within that precinct. One (1) Selectman-at-Large shall be elected by 
the voters of the entire town, all precinct candidates are eligible. Should the 
elected Selectman-at-Large receive a majority of votes in his or her precinct, 
the candidate receiving the next highest vote will represent that precinct. The 
Selectman-at-Large by virtue of popular vote, will serve as chairman. Selectmen 
holding office at the time of the acceptance of this article by the General 
Court shall remain in office until the next annual town election. Seconded. 
Mr. Wayne felt that the Board of Selectmen did what it wanted, rather than what 
the people wished, and Ipswich should be returned to the voters. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimusly opposed this article, as did the Finance Committee. The 
Government Study Committee opposed the article. The motion was defeated on a 
voice vote. 

Article 11 . To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 71E 
of Chapter 71 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to the extent of authorizing the 
establishment in the Town Treasury, of an adult education and/or continuing edu- 
cation fund, and a school property use fund, respectively, to be expended by the 
School Committee without further appropriation for the purposes of the adult edu- 
cation and/or continuing education program(s) and for the expenses incurred in 
making school property available for such use, from which the receipts held in 
such account (s) have been and will be derived, said fund(s), including any such 
fund in existence, if applicable, to be administered in accordance with the pro- 
visions of said Section 71 E; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

-8- 



School Superintendent Richard Thompson moved that the Town vote to accept the 
provisions of Section 71 E of Chapter 71 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to the 
extent of authorizing the establishment, in the Town Treasury, of an adult educa- 
tion and/or continuing education fund, and a school property use fund, respec- 
tively, to be expended by the School Committee without further appropriation for 
the purposes of the adult education and/or continuing education program(s) and 
for the expenses incurred in making school property available for such use, from 
which the receipts held in such account (s) have been and will be derived, said 
fund(s), including any such fund in existence, if applicable, to be administered 
in accordance with the provisions of said Section 71E. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, as amended; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

William George moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$60,000 for the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 
90 of the General Laws, as amended. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Com- 
mittee unanimously recommended. Motion carried on unanimous voice vote. 

Article 13» To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of money to be 
made available for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. LeClair moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000 
for the purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of money to be 
made available for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce. Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 14. To see what action the Town will take in regard to the transfer of 
any surplus funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Mr. LeClair moved that the Town transfer the sum of $86,686 from the Electric 
Light Department for the purpose of reducing taxes. Seconded. Board of Select- 
men and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote: 

(1) To raise and appropriate a sum of money to engage enginering services and to 
acquire any related materiel and/or other services for the repair of Town-owned 
and maintained bridges; 

(2) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, to accept, and expend any 
Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned pur- 
poses; and 

(3) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other 
interest (s) as may be necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, by gift, 
by lease, eminent domain or otherwise; or to take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote: (1) To raise and appropriate the sum of 
$20,000 to engage engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or 
other services for the repair of Town-owned and maintained bridges; 

(2) Tq authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, to accept, and expend any 
Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned pur- 
poses; and 

(3) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other 
interest (s) as may be necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, by 
gift, by lease, eminent domain, or otherwise. Seconded. $17,000 is to be spent 

-9- 



to finance work on the Winthrop Street Bridge, while $3,000 is for an information 
study of the Mill Road Bridge; half the cost will be reimbursed; Hamilton will 
share the cost. Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote: 

(1) To raise and appropriate a sum of money to engage engineering services and 
to acquire any related materiel and/or other services for the survey, design, in- 
stallation, and/or maintenance of drainage systems and structures; 

(2) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, to accept, and expend any 
Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned pur- 
poses; and 

(3) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other 
interest (s) as may be necessary to effectuate said installation and/or mainte- 
nance, by purchase, by gift, by lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote: (1) To raise and appropriate the sum of 
$25,000 to engage engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or 
other services for the survey, design, installation, and/or maintenance of drain- 
age systems and structures; 

(2) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any 
Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned pur- 
poses; and 

(3) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other 
interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said installation and/or mainte- 
nance, by purchase, by gift, by lease, eminent domain, or otherwise. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommended 5-4-1 abstention. This concerns Kimball Brook be- 
ing cleaned and cleared primarily between Linebrook Road and High Street. Costas 
Tsoutsouras wished to amend the motion, excluding that area. The Moderator ruled 
that could not be done, it would have to be a point of order since that area was 
not specifically mentioned in the article. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote pursuant to the provisions of Massachu- 
setts General Laws, Chapter 4, Section 4B, as amended: 

(1) To rescind its action taken under Article 30 of the March 04, 1935, Annual 
Town Meeting, which action accepted Section 48, of Chapter 31, placing its regu- 
lar Police Force under Civil Service; -and 

(2) To rescind its action taken under Article 30 of the March 02, 1936 Annual 
Town Meeting, which action accepted Section 48, of Chapter 31, placing its regu- 
lar Fire Department under Civil Service; or to take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Town Manager George Howe moved that the town vote pursuant to the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 4, Section 4B, as amended, to revoke the 
Town's acceptance of: (1) The provisions of Section 48 of Chapter 31 and/or 
Section 54 of Chapter 31 of the General laws, accepted by the Town by vote on 
Article 30 of the March 04, 1935 Annual Town Meeting; and by any and all other 
votes, which made the Regular Police Force of the Town subject to Chapter 31; and 
(2) The provisions of Section 48, Chapter 31 and/or Section 54 of Chapter 31 of 
the General Laws, accepted by the Town by vote on Article 30 of the March 02, 
1936 Annual Town Meeting, and by any and all other votes, which made the Regular 
Fire Department of the Town subject to Chapter 31 ; both of such revocations to 
take effect on January 01, 1984. Seconded. Mr. Pszenny stated the Board of 
Selectmen unanimously supported the article. Mr. Dupray stated that the Finance 
Committee recommended the article 5-2. Patrolman Gavin Keenan spoke in opposi- 
tion. Also speaking in favor of keeping Civil Service were Leonard McLoud, 
Charles Passales, Robert Gambale, Eliot Krause, Harry Leno, Joseph Carpenter. On 
a voice vote, the motion was defeated. 

-10- 



Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the 
Town of Ipswich by adding a new Chapter XVI "Personnel By-Law for Police and Fire 
Employees;" or to take any other action relative thereto. 

SUMMARY OF PROPOSED "CHAPTER XVI, 
PERSONNEL BY-LAW FOR POLICE AND FIRE PERSONNEL" 
Section 1 deals with the purpose of the By-Law, to provide a uniform and equi- 
table system for the classification, recruitment, selection, development, promo- 
tion and retention of all fire and police officers, and states that the By-Law 
shall be applicable only to officers hired after April 04, 1983. Section 2 makes 
the Town Manager responsible for administration of the By-Law. Section 3 re- 
quires the Town Manager to create a written classification plan and job descrip- 
tion, including all fire and police officers, based on factors such as the nature 
of the work, required knowledge, skills, and ability. The classification plan is 
to be utilized for setting compensation, testing, recruiting, transfers, and pro- 
motions. Section 4 deals with the proposed compensation plan, containing three 
steps and the effects on promotions, demotions, and re-employment. Section 5 
pertains to the methods to be utilized by the Town Manager for recruitment, se- 
lection, and appointment of police and fire personnel. The initial selection 
procedure details an eleven-step process, including testing and interviews by the 
Chief and Town Manager. Section 6 contains criteria for promotion within the two 
departments, setting forth six factors which the Town Manager must consider in 
each promotion. Section 7 requires the respective chiefs to conduct periodic 
written evaluations of the performance of all police and fire personnel. Section 

8 sets forth a procedure which the chief and the Town Manager must follow to dis- 
cipline, suspend, or discharge an employee; all police and fire personnel have 
the right of appeal to a neutral labor arbitrator if he or she chooses. Elements 
of just cause for disipline and procedure for lay-off are also set forth. Sec- 

9 contains a definition of seniority and its applications to full-time and part- 
time employees, interruptions in continuous work, promotions, and transfers. 

Mr. Howe moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 
36 of the April 06, 1981, Annual Town Meeting to the extent that the minimum 
selling price for the Shatswell School be revised; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under Article 36 
of the April 06, 1981 Annual Town Meeting to the extent that the minimum selling 
price for the Shatswell School be reduced from $125,000 to $75,000. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor, Finance Committee 8-1 in favor. Mr. Player 
stated he would like to see the property retained by the Town. Mrs. Christine 
Callahan spoke of the sewerage problems in the area and was against reducing the 
price. James Prato of the Ipswich Pool Committee, Mrs. A.W. Smith, Harold 
Jillson spoke against the motion. John Sanidas asked if the Police wanted the 
Shatswell School; Chief Brouillette asked that the Town keep the building. The 
motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

Stanley Eustace moved that the meeting adjourn until Tuesday, April 05, 1983 at 
7:30 p.m. Seconded, so voted. Meeting adjourned at 11:15 p.m. 

At 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 05, 1983 there was no quorum (349) present and it 
was moved, seconded and voted to wait until 7:45. At 8:03 p.m. there were 353 
voters present and the Moderator called the Meeting to order. The final count 
was 394. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: Raymond Barrows, Betty Anne Copley, 
Stanley Eustace, George Hovey, Robert Weatherall, and Ellin Brouillette. 

-11- 



It was moved, seconded and voted to admit non-voters to watch the proceedings. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote: 

( 1 ) To rescind its action under Article 36 of the April 06, 1981, Annual Town 
Meeting (which Article authorizes the Board of Selectmen to sell and convey title 
to the Shatswell School); 

(2) That the Shatswell School be retained as Town-owned property; and 

(3) That said Shatswell School be repaired and renovated for use as a Police 
Station and District Court House; and 

(4) To change the purpose for which monies were borrowed under Article 41 of the 
May 02, 1977, Annual Town Meeting, and under Article 27 of the May 01, 1978, 
Annual Town Meeting, from "remodeling and reconstruction of the Town Hall Annex 
for a Police Station" to "remodeling and reconstruction of the Shatswell School 
for a Police Station and District Court House;" or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Mr. Pszenny stated 
that Mr. Cormier had agreed to pay the full $300,000 asking price on the Bur ley 
and Shatswell Schools and build the allowable number of units (13 in the Bur ley, 
8 in the Shatswell). He informed the voters that if they voted for Indefinite 
Postponement, they would be indicating that they wished to sell the schools to 
Mr. Cormier. If they voted against the motion, they would be indicating they 
did not want to sell and wished to discuss other alternatives. After a long dis- 
cussion, in which John Hansbury suggested putting $300,000 together with $200,000 
presently available for a new police station, and Mrs. A.W. Smith said that she 
felt 'taken' - that we had voted not to lower the price on the Shatswell the 
night before and now the contractor had decided he would pay the higher price. 
She felt it was the voters' chance to speak for themselves and not do what the 
develper wanted. Chief Brouillete suggested that the properties be sold and that 
perhaps the Town Hall Annex would be the best location for a new police station 
without building a completely new building. Arthur Weagle questioned at what 
open meeting did the Board of Selectmen and/or Finance Committee agree to sell 
the buildings to Cormier? Mr. Dalton stated that he had received a call from 
Cormier's attorney at 4:30 p.m. informing him that his client was willing to pay 
the original price. At 6:45 Mr. Cormier and his attornery met with the Boards 
in the High School. Mr. LeClair urged selling the buildings to Cormier. There 
was more discussion before the question was moved, seconded, defeated on a voice 
vote. Stanley Eustace -said there had been another bidder a year ago. The 
Manager replied that it had not been a valid bid. James Prato stated that his 
Pool Committee had voted prior to the Meeting to vote in favor of giving the 
Shatswell School to the Police Department but now the Chief recommends selling 
the building and he found the whole matter very confusing. Harold Jillson and 
James Engel had also spoken on the question. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
supported selling the buildings for $300,000. The Finance Committee felt that 
the buildings should be sold for whatever price the Town could get. The question 
was moved, seconded, voted. On the main motion, a voice vote was in favor. 

Article 21 . To see if the Town will vote: 

(1) To rescind its action under Article 36 of the April 06, 1981, Annual Town 
Meeting (which Article authorizes the Board of Selectmen to sell and convey the 
Shatswell School); 

(2) That the Shatswell School be retained as Town-owned property; 

(3) That said Shatswell School be repaired and renovated for use as a recrea- 
tion facility, and/or that it be leased to a third party for said purposes, for a 
minimum price; and 

(4) To raise and appropriate a sum of money to effectuate said purposes; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

William George moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Carried on a voice 
vote. 

-12- 



Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 
35 of the April 06, 1981 Annual Town Meeting to the extent that the minimum 
selling price for the Burley School be revised; or to take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Mr. George moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Carried on a voice 
vote. 

Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend its action under Article 35 
of the April 06, 1981 Annual Town Meeting (which article authorized the Board of 
Selectmen to sell and convey the Burley School) by reducing the purchase price 
and by authorizing its sale or lease to the Ipswich Housing Authority; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Arthur Weagle felt it 
was not in the Town's best interests to sell the school. The Housing Authority 
needs the Burley School for housing but has no money to buy it; wants to lease 
it for $1. for a year so that it can try to get funds. Mrs. Dorman stated that 
Cormier's plan for the Burley School showed no playground and the property is in 
an area that has no playgrounds. She and several others urged a "no" on indefi- 
nite postponement, so that other motions could be made. A voice vote was incon- 
clusive; on the hand count, 122 voted in the affirmative, 205 in the negative; 
motion defeated. 

Mr. Weagle then moved that the Town vote to amend its action under Article 35 of 
the April 06, 1981 Annual Town Meeting to read as follows: That the Town vote to 
transfer the care, custody, management and control of the land and buildings sit- 
uate at 31 Mount Pleasant Avenue ("The Burley School"), being the same premises 
conveyed to the Town by deed of Harry B. Brown, recorded at Essex South District 
Registry of Deeds Book 1889, page 165, by deed of Albert Russell, recorded in 
said Registry of Deeds Book 1897, page 145, and by deed of Lucy S. Jewett and 
Elizabeth B. Jewett, recorded at said Registry of Deeds Book 1897, page 290; from 
the School Committee to the Board of Selectmen under the provisions of G.L., 
Chapter 40, Section 15 and Section 15A, for the purpose of the sale, lease and/or 
transfer of said land and buildings to the Ipswich Housing Authority for the pur- 
pose of public housing, pursuant to G.L., Chapter 121B, as amended, for the sum 
of One Dollar ($1.00). Such sale, lease and/or transfer shall be effected prior 
to December 31, 1983, in default of which this Town Meeting authority to sell, 
lease and/or transfer for the above-noted purpose shall automatically terminate. 
In the event that the above-noted purposes, then, in such case, the Selectmen are 
empowered and authorized to sell and convey said land and buildings and to exe- 
cute any and all necessary instruments to accompish said sale for a minimum 
amount of $175,000. Seconded. During the discussion following, Town Counsel 
stated that Mr. Cormier had a first option refusal and could buy the property at 
whatever price it was offered, if he so wished. Board of Selectmen was unani- 
mously opposed to motion, Finance Committee recommended against. Motion defeated 
on a voice vote. The vote was questioned. On a hand count, 1 30 voted in the 
affirmative, 173 in the negative; motion defeated. 

Mr. Barous asked if we were back to Article 35 (4/06/81) - yes, we are. Can the 
Meeting give the Board of Selectmen restrictions? Town Counsel: In the narrow 
sense, we can't, but the Board may be morally bound. Mr. Dalton ruled that the 
Meeting took proper action on Article 23. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money, in addition to that sum previously raised under Article 19 of the April 
05, 1982 Annual Town Meeting to engage engineering services and to acquire any 
related materiel and other services for conducting repairs to the Town Hall; to 
determine whether such monies shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from avail- 
able funds, or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

-13- 



Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $31,500 
to engage engineering services and to aqcuire any related materiel and other ser- 
vices for conducting repairs to Town Hall. Seconded. The Board of Selectmen 
suggested that these repairs be put off for a year or so in view of the fact that 
we are going to be looking into moving the Police Deaprtment into the Annex. 
Finance Committee recommended the article. Motion carried on voice vote. Vote 
questioned by seven voters. On the hand count, 151 voted in the affirmative, 112 
in the negative; motion carried. 

Article 25. To hear and act upon reports of committees, and to continue such 
committees as the Town may vote to continue. 

Mrs. Mary Conley moved that the report of the Historic District Study Committee 
be accepted and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mrs. Theresa Stephens moved that the report of the Hall-Haskell House Committee 
be accepted and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mrs. Dorcas Rice moved that the report of the Commuter Rail Committee be accepted 
and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 26. To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to 
the municipal budget and to raise, appropriate, and transfer money for the ensu- 
ing year, including the compensation of elected Town Officers, and to authorize 
the expenditure of a sum of monies from the Federal General Revenue Sharing 
account for the aforementioned purposes; or to take any other action relative 
thereto . 

William Craft of the Finance Committee moved that the sum of $4,068,223 be raised 
and appropriated for the purposes indicated in the Operating Budget: 

For the Operating Budget (see detail) $4,068,223 

Transfer from Available Funds: 

Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) 532,966 

Sewer Betterment Receipts 17,000 

Sewer User Fees 166,300 

Water Pollution Control and Chemicals 7,771 

Library Aid 5,579 

County Dog Fund 40 

Overlay Surplus to Reserve Fund 45,000 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 27,800 

Library Trust Fund 10,800 



Transfer from Revenue Sharing: 

Health and Life benefits 52,000 

Sanitation Contract 245,000 

Available Funds and Revenue Sharing: 
Net To Be Raised and Assessed 



$ 813,256 

52,000 

245,000 

$ 297,000 



003 SELECTMEN: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Total 



ring: 


$1,110,256 
$2,957,967 


OPERATING BUDGET 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

FY81 FY82 
Expended Expended 


FY83 FY84 
Appro- Recom- 
priated mended 


$ 6,845 $ 6,869 
1,696 1,774 
8,541 8,643 


$ 10,329 $ 10,946 

2,093 2,093 

12,422 13,039 



-14- 



005 TOWN MANAGER: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Labor Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

009 MODERATOR: 
Salary 
Expenses 
Total 

011 FINANCE COMMITTEE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

015 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

025 ACCOUNTANT: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Total 

029 ASSESSORS: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

033 TREASURER/ COLLECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

039 TOWN CLERK: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

045 LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Town Counsel -Litigation 
Expenses 
Total 

061 APPEALS BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

063 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 



53,712 
14,940 
12,264 
116 
81,032 


57,570 

13,160 

6,624 



77,354 


62,122 

15,544 

2,000 

75 

79,741 


67,322 

14,236 

5,000 

8,883 

95,441 


75 



75 


100 



100 


100 

10 

110 


100 

10 
110 



1,279 
1,279 



1,726 
1,726 


50 
2,650 
2,700 


50 
2,650 
2,700 


12,165 

4,030 

16,195 


5,712 
3,684 
9,396 


11,705 

3,800 

15,505 


10,471 

4,300 

14,771 


48,307 

3,834 

52,141 


55,556 

3,000 

58,556 


60,607 
10,595 
71,202 


65,083 
10,400 
75,483 


48,688 

8,174 

779 

57,641 


51,057 

7,986 

150 

59,193 


57,793 

15,080 



72,873 


59,575 

6,755 

120 

66,450 


50,773 

5,867 

456 

57,096 


61,111 

10,483 

4,582 

76,176 


71,870 

14,885 



86,725 


77,691 

17,691 



95,382 


25,230 
1,783 
2,500 

29,513 


27,303 

1,596 



28,899 


28,036 

1,450 



29,486 


30,911 
1,495 
1,317 

33,723 


9,074 
10,763 

1,,981 
21,818 


9,074 
12,185 

1,779 
23,038 


9,074 

8,000 

910 

17,984 


9,074 
11,000 

1,084 
21,158 


540 
253 
793 


520 
245 
765 


550 
403 
953 


550 
316 
866 


698 
158 


593 
247 


1,200 
475 


1,200 
475 



-15- 



Planning Consultants: 

Reimbursable 

General 
Total 

065 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 




5,000 
5,856 



11,588 

17,725 



29,313 

360,793 




7,724 
8,564 



10,521 

18,057 



28,578 

380,988 



1,000 
1,000 
3,675 



12,526 

20 , 342 

5,508 

38,376 



1,000 
1,000 
3,675 



13,816 

13,185 

7,225 

34,226 



431,752 457,024 



PUBLIC SAFETY 








101 POLICE DEPARTMENT: 










Salaries & Wages 










Chief Base 


27,023 


29,508 


29,507 


33,782 


Sergeants Base 


65,130 


78,280 


75,407 


85,462 


Patrolmen Base 


233,171 


258,139 


261,358 


298,128 


Contractural Wage Adjustment 


22,484 











Incentive 


42,105 


39,820 


41,795 


48,594 


Holiday 


16,451 


18,928 


17,943 


20,365 


Overtime 


10,978 


15,528 


15,000 


18,925 


Shift Differential 


5,562 


6,351 


6,675 


7,212 


Court Fees 


7,192 


9,230 


10,000 


12,450 


Other Salaries 


13,803 


19,969 


24,360 


32,786 


Uniform Payments 








8,000 


8,000 


Total Salaries 


443,899 


475,753 


490,045 


565,704 


Expenses 


66,686 


69,069 


18,207 


18,590 


Energy Supplies 








24,462 


19,380 


Capital Outlay 


26,609 


3,359 


17,590 


11,043 


Total 


537,194 


548,181 


550,304 


614,717 


103 FIRE DEPARTMENT: 










Salaries & Wages 










Chief Base 


23,932 


25,457 


27,239 


29,146 


Lieutenants Base 


63,232 


70,097 


70,748 


82,900 


Firefighters Base 


170,818 


170,960 


187,105 


212,515 


Contractual Wage Adjustment 


9,588 











Overtime 


16,416 


19,590 


12,330 


19,000 


Call Capt (1) & Call Lieut (3) 


3,000 


3,917 


4,300 


4,100 


Call Operators (8) 


3,633 


3,162 


6,000 


800 


Call Men (32) 


20,700 


22,500 


23,400 


28,800 


Acting Officers 











750 


Incentive & Differential 


1,642 


1,770 


3,900 


2,250 


Holiday 





11,932 


12,849 


14,544 


Uniform Payments 








4,163 


4,500 


Total Salaries 


312,961 


329,385 


352,034 


399,305 


Training 











5,275 


Expenses 


42,275 


34,173 


31,801 


23,154 


Energy Supplies 








7,085 


6,885 


Capital Outlay 


23,458 


10,912 


7,200 


14,595 


Total 


378,694 


374,470 


398,120 


449,214 


109 FORESTRY: 










Salaries & Wages 


42,693 


42,229 


47,931 


51,696 


Expenss 


24,743 


31,280 


15,662 


18,012 


Energy Supplies 








6,123 


4,619 



-16- 



Capital Outlay 
Total 

111 HARBORS: 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Total 

112 SHELLFISH: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

113 BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

131 CIVIL DEFENSE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

133 ANIMAL CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY : 1 , 05 1 , 900 1 , 065 , 806 1 , 1 02 , 465 1 , 222 , 633 



959 
68,395 


915 
74,424 


4,200 
73,916 


1,000 
75,327 














4,000 

2,330 

202 

6,532 


4,000 

2,240 

171 

6,411 


18,455 

4,375 



1,999 

24,829 


20,282 

6,553 



1,988 

28,823 


24,415 

3,970 

2,700 



31,085 


25,420 
4,295 
1,705 
1,500 

32,920 


18,094 

1,726 

19,820 


19,143 

1,607 

20,750 


20,747 

1,875 

22,622 


20,197 

1,875 

22,072 


2,400 

1,738 





4,138 


2,400 

1,585 





3,985 


2,400 

1,585 





3,985 


2,400 

1,560 

100 

750 

4,810 


10,475 

2,755 



5,600 

18,830 


12,000 

3,173 





15,173 


12,840 

2,069 

922 



15,901 


13,739 

2,533 

890 



17,162 





PUBLIC WORKS 








301 ADMINISTRATION: 










Salaries & Wages 


31,754 


33,951 


36,326 


38,865 


Expenses 


1,592 


1,422 


1,631 


1,660 


Total 


33,346 


35,373 


37,957 


40,525 


303 HIGHWAY DIVISION: 










Salaries & Wages 


94,961 


102,232 


111,623 


121,817 


Expenses 


134,285 


168,530 


195,378 


130,457 


Road Treatment 











125,000 


Capital Outlay 


60,007 


2,193 


2,800 


32,353 


Total 


289,253 


272,955 


309,801 


409,627 


305 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 










Salaries & Wages 


10,259 


25,691 


15,000 


15,000 


Expenses 


32,919 


52,927 


30,900 


39,875 


Energy Supplies 











3,500 


Rental 


8,598 


18,823 


12,000 


12,000 


Total 


51,776 


97,441 


57,900 


70,375 



-17- 



309 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 










Salaries & Wages 


13,144 


16,274 


19,261 


20,573 


Expenses 


40 , 499 


35,726 


34,011 


30,320 


Energy Supplies 








18,246 


15,584 


Capital Outlay 


6,752 


1,500 





2,700 


Total 


60,395 


53,500 


71,518 


69,177 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS: 434,770 459,269 477,176 589,704 

SANITATION 
403 SANITATION CONTRACT: 

Sanitation Composite Contract 205,000 220,000 237,000 237,000 

Spring & Fall Cleaning 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 

Total 213,000 228,000 245,000 245,000 

409 SEWER: 

Salaries & Wages 86,654 93,327 128,329 133,310 

Expenses 132,464 149,206 125,922 125,905 

Energy Supplies 14,886 13,289 

Capital Outlay 4,954 2,505 1,710 1,540 

Total 224,072 245,038 270,847 274,044 

TOTAL SANITATION: 437,072 473,038 515,847 519,044 



OTHER 


ENVIRONMENTAL 


SERVICES 






481 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 










Expenses 





100 


225 


500 


Total 





100 


225 


500 


INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION: 










Expenses 


1,386 











Total 


1,386 











487 CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 










Salaries & Wages 


385 


258 


900 


1,000 


Expenses 


167 


310 


705 


870 


Capital Outlay 





488 


1,100 


1,000 


Total 


552 


1,056 


2,705 


2,870 



TOTAL OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 1,938 1,156 2,930 3,370 



501 



531 





HUMAN SERVICES 








HEALTH: 










Salaries & Wages 


33,605 


. 35,466 


35,010 


35,042 


Expenses 


37,497 


45,979 


60,190 


71,628 


Capital Outlay 


100 











Total 


71,202 


81,445 


95,200 


106,670 


COUNCIL ON AGING: 










Salaries & Wages 


480 


72 


3,640 


3,640 


Expenses 


5,841 


8,611 


13,441 


11,639 


Total 


6,321 


8,683 


17,081 


15,279 



-18- 



551 VETERANS BENEFITS: 
Expenses 
Total 

571 CEMETERIES & GROUNDS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES: 



95,717 
95,717 



75,750 

11,339 



666 

87,755 



82,255 
82,255 



100,921 

32,175 



6,265 

139,361 



100,500 
100,500 



121,480 

17,942 

12,278 

6,900 

158,600 



100,500 
100,500 



128,716 

20,231 

9,631 

11,300 

169,878 



260,995 311,744 371,381 392,327 



CULTURE & RECREATION 



601 LIBRARY: 










Salaries & Wages 


80,418 


80,480 


93,635 


101,690 


Expenss 


39,008 


37,705 


36,731 


39,378 


Energy Supples 








3,302 


2,634 


Capital Outlay 


5,874 


65 


6,300 


5,180 


Total 


125,300 


118,250 


139,968 


148,882 


621 RECREATION & YOUTH SERVICES: 










Salaries & Wages 


68,305 


26,126 


30,665 


35,513 


Expenses 


26,927 


13,853 


16,694 


17,599 


Energy Supplies 











682 


Capital Outlay 


2,116 








375 


Total 


97,348 


39,979 


47,359 


54,169 



TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION: 



222,648 158,229 187,327 203,051 





UNCLASSIFIED 








069 INSURANCE: 










Unemployment 


2,934 





5,000 


2,000 


Motor Vehicle 


11,384 


12,618 


14,451 


14,652 


Workmen's Compensation 


30,458 


28,984 


32,634 


37,048 


Package Insurance 


22,215 


21,128 


21,541 


23,219 


Public Official Bonds 


678 


736 


871 


812 


Legal Liability 


5,101 


5,642 


5,686 


5,925 


Total 


72,770 


69,108 


80,183 


83,656 


069 BENEFITS: 










Military Svc. Credits 


16,198 


16,502 


17,007 


17,857 


County Retirement System 


299,438 


275,512 


331,514 


274,055 


Health & Life 


142,405 


175,452 


96,292 


79,006 


Total 


458,041 


467,466 


444,813 


370,918 


701 DEBT SERVICE: 










Payment of Interest 


70,678 


45,831 


32,533 


23,136 


Payment of Principal 


391 ,000 


266,500 


198,500 


133,500 


Total 


461,678 


312,331 


231,033 


156,636 


069 OFFICE EQUIPMENT: 





3,729 


4,160 


4,160 


013 RESERVE FUND: (See Schedule) 


45,905 


22,566 


45,000 


45,000 


701 INTEREST ON TAX ANTICIPATION 


NOTES: 5,854 


3,790 


10,000 


10,000 



-19- 



069 POSTAGE: 8,325 9,000 10,700 10,700 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 1,052,573 887,900 825,889 681,070 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET: $3,882,689 $3,738,220 $3,914,767 $4,068,223 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommended, Board of Selectmen unanimously recom- 
mended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,390 in addition to the $8,910 budgeted for the salary of the Recreation and 
Youth Director for the purpose of continuing the present scope of responsibili- 
ties for recreation programs, planning and related activities; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Helen Badenhausen moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$4,267 in addition to the $10,033 budgeted for the salary of the Recreation and 
Youth Director for the purpose of continuing the present scope of responsibili- 
ties for recreation programs, planning, and related activities. Seconded. Mrs. 
Badenhausen stated the real issue is the amount of hours necessary for the Recre- 
ation Director to do the job. An additional 400 hours per year is necessary. 
Mr. George asked Mr. Dalton his opinion on the article; Mr. Dalton felt the 
Charter provided the answer that the Manager supervises and directs the admini- 
stration of all departments, and that he fixes the compensation of all officers 
and employees. The Board of Selectmen unanimously opposed the article; Finance 
Committee unanimously against article, feeling it might be setting a precedent. 
Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Ipswich, Section V "Use Regulations" subsection "D. Table of Use 
Regulations" by adding a second paragraph to subsection "D" as follows: "The 
processing, treating and storing of volatile liquids, hazardous wastes, and haz- 
ardous chemicals, (other than heating fuel, diesel fuel and gasoline), in quanti- 
ties exceeding two hundred (200) gallons shall not be permitted in any district. 
Hazardous wastes and chemicals shall be defined as those listed by the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, Department of Environmental Quality Engineering, Divi- 
sion of Hazardous Wastes issued under authority of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 21 C, as amended; treating, processing and storing of volatile liquids, 
hazardous wastes and hazardous chemicals in quantities of less than two hundred 
(200) gallons (1000 lbs. dry weight), provided that no single container exceeds 
fifty-five (55) gallons, shall be permitted in any district. Except for retail 
establishments storing inventory of 5 gallons or less, use shall be allowed only 
by special permit issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals. As a condition of spe- 
cial permit, all non-consumptive uses shall be monitored by an inventory system 
accounting for all incoming and outgoing material"; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Planning Board Chairman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich, Section V "Table of Use Regula- 
tions", Subsection D "Table of Use Regulations", by adding a second paragraph to 
Subsection D as follows: "The processing, treating and storing of volatile liq- 
uids, hazardous wastes, and hazardous chemicals (other than heating fuel, diesel 
fuel, and gasoline) in quantities exceeding two hundred (200) gallons shall not 
be permitted in any district. Hazardous Wastes and Chemicals shall be defined as 
those listed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Quality Engineering, Division of Hazardous Wastes, issued under authority of 
Masachusetts General Laws, Chapter 21 C, as amended. Treating, processing and 
storing of volatile liquids, hazardous wastes, and hazardous chemicals in quanti- 
ties less than two hundred (200) gallons (1000 lbs. dry weight), provided that no 

-20- 



single container exceeds 55 gallons, shall be permitted in any district. Except 
for retail establishments storing inventory of five (5) gallons or less, uses 
shall be allowed only by special permit issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals. 
As a condition of special permit, all uses shall be monitored by an inventory 
system accounting for all incoming and outgoing material." Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the present General By-Laws of 
the Town of Ipswich, Article XV, Section 12, by adding after the last sentence of 
subsection 7 thereof, the following: 

"Subsurface tanks used only for the storage of No. 2 fuel oil for residential 
home heating purposes shall: 

a) Be exempt from Article XV, Section 12, subsection 1, if encased in a poly- 
ethelene container approved by the Fire Chief and the Board of Health of the 
Town of Ipswich; 

b) Be installed in accordance with applicable Massachusetts building codes, 
state laws, and regulations of the State Fire Marshall; 

c) Include Electrical isolators and swing fittings for all exterior connections 
to the tank; 

d) Be connected to an oil burner"; or to take any other action relative there- 
to. (By Petition) 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to amend the present General By-Laws of the 
Town of Ipswich, Article XV, Section 12, by adding after the last sentence of 
Subsection 7 thereof, the following: 

"Subsurface tanks used only for the storage of #2 fuel oil for residential home 
heating purposes shall: 

a) Be exempt from Article XV, Section 12, Subsection 1, if encased in a poly- 
ethelene container approved by the Fire Chief and the Board of Health of the 
Town of Ipswich; 

b) Be installed in accordance with applicable Masssachusetts building codes, 
state laws, and regulations of the State Fire Marshall; 

c) Include electrical isolators and swing fittings for all exterior connections 
to the tank; 

d) Be connected to an oil burner." 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended; Finance Committee recom- 
mended, Conservation Commission recommended. A discussion followed on the merits 
of polyethelene versus concrete. The question was moved, seconded, unanimous 
voice vote. On the motion, affirmative voice vote. 

It being 11:00 p.m., Mr. Pszenny moved the Meeting adjourn until Wednesday, April 
06, 1983 at 7:30 p.m. Seconded, unanimous voice vote. 

There were 103 voters present at 7:30 p.m. on April 06th, and it was moved, sec- 
onded, and voted to postpone until 7:45 p.m. At 7:50 with still no quorum, it 
was moved, seconded, and voted to wait until 8:00. At 8:00 with only 209 voters 
present, Mr. Pszenny moved that the Meeting be postponed until Tuesday, April 12, 
1983. Seconded and so voted. 

On Tuesday, April 12th, there were 175 voters present at 7:30 p.m. The Meeting 
was postponed until 7:45. At 7:45 there were 260 present and the Meeting post- 
poned until 8:15. At 8:30 with 28 voters needed to make a quorum, the Meeting 
was postponed until 8:45. At 8:55 there was a quorum of 349 present and the Mod- 
erator called the Meeting to order. The final count was 356. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: Albert Howes, David Carleton, Gordon 
Player, John Hansbury, and Robert Weatherall. 

-21- 



Article 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Ipswich, Section VI, "Dimensional and Density Regulation," subsec- 
tion B. "Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations," by adding the following 
footnote thereto: 

"Footnote No. 9 - In the case of an irregular, narrow, or shallow lot, or a lot 
unusual, either in shape or topography, or a lot on which an existing building 
is, in the reasonable judgment of the Planning Board, non-conforming within the 
business district, the boundaries of which would follow the center line of the 
street; beginning on the center line of South Main Street at Choate Bridge; 
thence Westerly along South Main Street and Central Street to Hammatt Street; 
thence Southerly along Hammatt Street to Washington Street; thence Easterly on 
Washington Street to Depot Square; thence Northerly on Market Street about two 
hundred (200') feet to a point opposite the southerly property line of land now 
or formerly of John H. Levere (Assessor's Map 42A, Lot 200); thence Easterly 
along the Southerly property line of land of John H. Levere crossing Union Street 
and along the Southerly property line of land now or formerly of Daniel D. and 
Kenneth F. Gibbon (Assessor's map 42A, Lot 185) to the channel of the Ipswich 
River; thence Northerly on the channel of the Ipswich River to the Centerline of 
South Main Street on Choate Bridge; all as designated on a draft amended map on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk. The Planning Board may, at its discretion, 
by special permit, further reduce lot area, lot width, lot frontage, front, side 
and rear yards, building area, and/or open space if in the reasonable judgment of 
the Planning Board said reduction(s) is (are) consistent with the purpose of this 
By-Law"; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

James Warner of the Planning Board moved that the Town vote to amend the Protec- 
tive Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich, Section VI "Dimensional and Density 
Regulations", Subsection B "Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations", by 
adding the number 9 (for purposes of designating a footnote) to the District 
Heading "Business" and adding the following footnote #9 at the bottom of said 
Table: 

"9. In the case of a lot which is located within that portion of the business 
district described in this footnote number 9 and which is an irregular, narrow or 
shallow lot, or a lot unusual, either in shape or topography, or a lot on which 
an existing building is non-conforming, in the reasonable judgment of the Plan- 
ning Board, the Planning Board may, at its discretion, by special permit, further 
reduce lot area, lot width, lot frontage, front, side and rear yards, building 
area, and/or open space if in the reasonable judgment of the Planning Board said 
reduction(s) is (are) consistent with the purpose of this by-Law. The boundaries 
of said portion of the business district shall follow the center line of the 
street; beginning on the center line of South Main Street at Choate Bridge; 
thence Westerly along South Main Street, Market Square and Central Street to 
Hammatt Street; thence Southerly along Hammatt Street to Washington Street; 
thence Easterly on Washington Street to Depot Square; thence Northerly on Market 
Street about two hundred (200 f ) feet to a point opposite the Southerly property 
line of land now or formerly of John H. Levere (Assessor's Map 42A, Lot 200); 
thence Easterly along the Southerly property line of land now or formerly of 
Daniel D. and Kenneth F. Gibbon (Assessor's Map 42A, Lot 185) to the channel of 
the Ipswich River; thence Northerly on the channel of the Ipswich River to the 
centerline of South Main Street on Choate Bridge; all as designated on an amended 
map on file in the office of the Town Clerk." 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Costas 
Tsoutsouras spoke in opposition. Question was moved, seconded, unanimous voice 
vote. Voice vote on motion was inconclusive, on the hand count 254 voted in 
favor, 20 opposed; motion carried. 

Article 31 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Ipswich, Section VIII "Signs" by adding a new subsection as fol- 

-22- 



lows: 
"D. Permit and Appeal Process. 

1. Permit. Any other provision of the By-Law to the contrary notwithstanding, 
no person shall install or erect a sign without having obtained in advance a per- 
mit therefor. 

2. Appeal Process. If the Building Inspector determines that one or more limi- 
tations or requirements specified in Subsections B and/or C of Section VIII can- 
not be met, the Board of Appeals, in the circumstances described in this para- 
graph, may grant by special permit a sign that would otherwise not be allowed. 
The special circumstances may include: unusual configuration, location, or use 
of a building; the presence on a building of a maximum number of signs; a sign 
size larger than that permitted if it is appropriate because of the natural space 
for a sign on a facade or because of other architectural features of a building. 
The sign area shall be limited to (1) one and one-half square feet for each lin- 
eal foot horizontal length of the facade of the business displaying the sign; (2) 
three-fourths of the length of the facade of the business displaying the sign; 
(3) a projection of no more than twelve inches from the face of the building. 
Prior to the granting of a special permit, the Board of Appeals must find that 
the sign is consistent with the purpose of the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, as set forth in Section 1;" or to take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Mr. McNally moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, Section VIII "Signs" by adding a new Subsection as follows: 
"D. Permit and Appeal Process. 

1. Permit. Any other provision of the By-Law to the contrary notwithstanding, 
no person shall install or erect a sign without having obtained in advance a per- 
mit therefor. 

2. Appeal Process. If the Building Inspector determines that one or more limi- 
tations or requirements specified in Subsections B and/or C of Section VIII can- 
not be met, the Board of Appeals, in the circumstances described in this para- 
graph, may grant by special permit a sign that would otherwise not be allowed. 
The special circumstances may include: Unusual configuration, location, or use 
of a building; the presence on a building of a maximum number of signs; a sign 
size larger than that permitted if it is appropriate because of the natural space 
for a sign on a facade or because of other architectural features of a building. 
The sign area shall be limited to (1) one and one-half square feet for each lin- 
eal foot horizontal length of the facade of the business displaying the sign; (2) 
three-fourths of the length of the facade of the business displaying the sign; 
(3) a projection of no more than twelve inches from the face of the building. 
Prior to the granting of a special permit, the Board of Appeals must find that 
the sign is consistent with the purpose of the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, as set forth in Section 1." Seconded. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Ipswich Protective 
Zoning By-Law to establish a Water Supply District A and a Water Supply District 
B as overlays to the Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, and to es- 
tablish restrictions on the use of land within said Districts; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

SUMMARY OF PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE PROTECTIVE ZONING BY-LAW 
OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH, ESTABLISING A WATER SUPPLY 
DISTRICT A AND A WATER SUPPLY DISTRCT B: 
The purpose of the two new "Water Supply districts" is the protection of public 
health and safety by preserving and maintaining the quantity and quality of the 
Town's water supplies. The proposed amendment adds a new Section IX. C. to the 
existing Zoning By-Law pertaining to the protection of aquifers and water supply 
areas. These areas are designated "Water Supply Districts" and are to be identi- 
fied by geologic and hydrologic testing, including drilling, observation wells, 

-23- 



existing boring and pumping tests, and geologic mapping. Definitions of mo3t of 
the technical and scientific terms used in the By-Law are added to the Defini- 
tions Section of the Town's present Zoning By-Law. Two water supply districts 
are defined, essentially areas around the Town's reservoirs and existing wells, 
including Essex Road, Fellows Road, Winthrop Wells, Brown's Well, and the Mile 
Lane Wells, and the Dow Brook and Bull Brook reservoirs. The exact areas desig- 
nated "Water Supply Districts" are shown on a map on file in the Town Clerk's of- 
fice and available for public inspection during the Town's normal working hours. 

If there is a dispute between the Town and a landowner concerning whether a par- 
ticular parcel of land is in the "Water Supply District" or if there is a con- 
flict between the Town's map and the scientific testing, the burden of proof and 
cost of establishing that the parcel of land is not in the Water Supply District 
are on the landowner. If the landowner requests, the Town must hire a profes- 
sional engineer to determine the existence or non-existence of the "Water Supply 
District"; the allocation of costs in this case is not specified. 

If a parcel of land is within the "Water Supply District", various uses are 
allowed only if the Planning Board grants a Special Permit. Among prohibited 
uses are: Use and Storage of toxic materials, excluding petroleum products; 
automotive service stations; dry cleaning stores; funeral parlors; photo-proces- 
sing establishments; printing shops; hairdressers; and laboratories which use 
toxic materials. The Planning Board is given the right to issue Special Permits 
for most of this list of uses in the second Water Suply District, designated "B" 
- areas in the vicinity of Brown's and Mile Lane wells in which "the prevailing 
direction of surface water flow is away from the permeable deposits." 

The criteria the Planning Board must utilize in granting a Special Permit are set 
forth; the Planning Board may engage a professional engineer to review the land- 
owner's application for a Special Permit, at the cost of the landowner. If a 
Special Permit is granted, the Planning Board can require periodic monitoring and 
sampling of wastewater and groundwater on the land, at the expense of the land- 
owner. 

Planning Board member Wayne King moved that the Town vote to amend the Town of 
Ipswich Protective Zoning By-Law by adding a new Section IX. C and certain other 
related paragraphs and phrases. 

The following is a summary of the proposed amendments establishing a Water Supply 
District A and a Water Supply District B. 

The purpose of the two new "Water Supply Districts" is the protection of public 
health and safety by preserving and maintaining the quantity and quality of the 
Town's water supplies. The proposed amendment adds a new Section IX. C. to the 
existing Zoning By-Law pertaining to the protection of aquifers and water supply 
areas. These areas are designated "Water Supply Districts" and are identified 
by geologic and hydrologic testing; the tests included borings, observation 
wells, and pumping. Existing records of borings, pumping tests and geologic maps 
were also analyzed. Definitions of most of the technical and scientific terms 
used in this section are added to the Definitions Section of the Town's present 
Zoning By-Law. 

Two water supply districts are defined. District A, which occurs in two loca- 
tions, is essentially the area overlying the watersheds for Dow Brook and Bull 
Brook reservoirs, the aquifers for the Essex Road, the Fellow's Road and the Win- 
throp Wells, and part of the aquifer for the Brown's and Mile Lane Wells. Dis- 
trict B overlies the remaining part of the aquifer for the Brown's and Mile Lane 
Wells. The exact areas designated "Water Supply Districts" are shown on a map on 
file in the Town Clerk's office and available for public inspecton during the 
Town's normal working hours. 

-24- 



The "Water Supply District" boundaries follow lot lines, roads and streams that 
most nearly coincide with the geologic criteria. 

If a lot is within the "Water Supply District", various uses are totally forbid- 
den and various uses are allowed only if the Planning Board grants a Special Per- 
mit . 

In District A, prohibited uses include the sale, use and storage of hazardous and 
toxic materials such as gasoline, degreasers, cleaning fluids, etc. which are 
associated with automotive service stations, dry cleaners, funeral homes, photo 
processing establishments, printing establishments, beauty shops and some types 
of laboratories. In District B, these uses may be permitted by a Special Permit 
granted by the Planning Board. 

Present and future single and two-family homes will not be affected by the re- 
quirements of this By-Law. Nor will agricultural practices be affected except 
for the long-term storage of large amounts of manure in District A, where a Spe- 
cial Permit will be required. 

The criteria the Planning Board must utilize in granting a Special Permit are set 
forth; the Planning Board may engage a professional engineer to review the land- 
owner's application for a Special Permit, at the cost of the landowner. If a 
Special Permit is granted, the Planning Board can require periodic monitoring and 
sampling of wastewater and groundwater on the land, at the expense of the land- 
owner. 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor; Finance Committee 7-2 in favor. 
Mario Marini asked that the restrictions on manure stockpiling be sticken, as he 
felt it would affect his operations adversely. After discussion, Mr. Marini 
moved to amend Article 32 by striking out the following section: Section IX, 
Subsection C: 

WATER SUPPLY DISTRICTS - TABLE OF USES 

District A District B 

Stockpiling agricultural wastes generated outside 

the district in quantities exceeding 50 cubic 

yards for periods exceeding 2 weeks SPB P 

Seconded. Mr. Marini was assured by Town officials that he was protected under 
the proposed By-Law, and he thereupon asked that the amendment be withdrawn - 
done. The question was moved, seconded and carried. A voice vote on the origi- 
nal motion was not clear; on the hand count, 197 voted in the affirmative, 77 in 
the negative; motion carried. 

Article 33. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town street Spiller's 
Lane as shown on "Plan of Subdivision of Land of Meadow Brook Builders, Inc. to 
be known as Settler's Landing Subdivision, Ipswich, Mass., July 28, 1965, Scale 
1" = 40', Chester J. Patch, Jr., C.E., Ipswich, Mass.," (Essex South Registry of 
Deeds, Book 105, Plan 68) said plan being on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk; and to accept as Town streets Cobbler's Lane and Pillowlace Lane as shown 
on "Plan of subdivision of land of Arthur S. and Olive I. Heard, to be known as 
Forest Park Ipswich, Ipswich, Mass., September 24, 1963, Scale 1" = 40', Frank 
Hancock, Essex Survey Service, 275 Cabot St., Beverly, Mass." (Essex South Regis- 
try of Deeds Books 110, Plan 94); said plan being on file in the office of the 
Town Clerk; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to accept as a Town street Spiller's Lane as 
shown on "Plan of Subdivision of Land of Meadow Brook Builders, Inc. to be known 
as Settler's Landing Subdivision, Ipswich, Mass., July 28, 1965, Scale 1" = 40'. 
Chester J. Patch, Jr., C.E., Ipswich, Mass.", (Essex South Registry of Deeds, 

-25- 



Book 105, Plan 68) said plan being on file in the office of the Town Clerk; and 
to accept as Town streets Cobbler's Lane and Pillowlace Lane as shown on "Plan of 
subdivision of land of Arthur S. and Olive I. Heard, to be known as Forest Park 
Ipswich, Ipswich, Mass., September 24, 1963, Scale 1" = 40', Frank Hancock, Essex 
Survey Service, 275 Cabot Street, Beverly, Mass." (Essex South Registry of Deeds, 
Book 110, Plan 94); said plan being on file in the office of the Town Clerk. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. All 
streets are relatively new and in good shape. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 34. To see if the Town will vote to accept as approved public ways those 
sections of Edge Street, Dix Road and James Road not currently accepted by the 
Town as public ways, as shown in part on "Plan of Willowdale Acres, Ipswich, 
Mass., as-built plans and profiles of James Road, Edge Street and Dix Road, con- 
sisting of three sheets, as prepared by Raymond Engineering Service, 240 
Cambridge St., Burlington, Mass., dated August 14, 1 98 1 ; " or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Mr. LeClair moved that the Town vote to accept as approved public ways those sec- 
tions of Edge Street, Dix Road, and James Road not currently accepted by the Town 
as public ways, as shown in part on "Plan of Willowdale Acres, Ipswich, Mass., 
as-built plans and profiles of James Road, Edge Street and Dix Road, consisting 
of three sheets, as prepared by Raymond Engineering Service, 240 Cambridge 
Street, Burlington, Mass., dated August 14, 1981." Seconded. Board of Selectmen 
asked that roads be accepted so that Town could make necessary repairs. Mr. 
Krause stated that the developer made a mess and the Town is going to pay for it. 
Mr. McNally said that the roads were in good condition when the Board returned 
the contractor's (Rosnoe Construction) bond. Neither the Planning Board nor the 
Town Manager had any cost figures on repairing the roads. David Clements sug- 
gested a lien against the developer but was told Town Meeting doesn't have that 
authority. Motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

Article 35. To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to the provisions of Massa- 
chusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 5, clause 27B, to establish a special 
fund for the celebration of the 350th anniversary of the incorporation of the 
Town of Ipswich; to direct that the appropriation authorized under Article 56, of 
the April 05, 1982, Annual Town Meeting be placed in said special fund; and to 
raise and appropriate or to transfer from available funds an additional sum of 
money to be placed in said fund; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Joseph Carpenter moved that the Town vote, pursuant to the provisions of Massa- 
chusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 5, clause 27B, to establish a special 
fund for the celebration of the 350th anniversary of the incorporation of the 
Town of Ipswich; to direct that the balance of the appropriation authorized under 
Article 56, of the April 05, 1982 Annual Town Meeting be placed in said special 
fund; to transfer the sum of $15,750 from free cash to said special fund; and to 
direct that said special fund shall expire on December 31 , 1984 and that upon its 
expiration, the monies then within said special fund be closed to the general 
fund. Seconded. The total amount to be appropriated will be $35,000 (in 1982, 
1983 and 1984) and the main celebration will- run from July 07, 1984 to August 05, 
1984. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 26C 
of Chapter 148 of the General Laws which prescribes that apartment houses con- 
taining six or more dwelling units, hotels, boarding or lodging houses, or family 
hotels which are not regulated by Section 26A and 26B shall be equipped with an 
automatic smoke or heat detector in each dwelling unit and in each hallway floor, 
and that the Fire Chief shall enforce the provisions of Section 27C; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

-26- 



Fire Chief Edwin Emerson moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Section 26C of Chapter 148 of the General Laws which prescribes that apartment 
houses containing six or more dwelling units, hotels, boarding or lodging houses, 
or family hotels which are not regulated by Sections 26 A and 26B shall be 
equippped with an automatic smoke or heat detector in each dwelling unit and in 
each hallway floor, and that the Fire Chief shall enforce the provisions of Sec- 
tion 26C. Seconded. Mr. LeClair stated that State law will require this by July 
01 , 1984 and there are approximately thirty buildings in Town falling under Sec- 
tion 26C. The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. Finance Committee 
recommended. Motion carried on unanimous voice vote. 

Article 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, Chapter XV, Section 5(b) by deleting the same in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following: "(b) Notwithstanding the provisions 
of paragraph (a) above, and of Chapter 140, Section 173A of the General Laws, the 
final disposition of each case shall be in accordance with the following sched- 
ule: First Offense punishable by a $10 fine 
Second Offense punishable by a $25 fine 
Third Offense punishable by a $30 fine 
Fourth Offense punishable by a $50 fine and de- 
struction of the dog, or placement 
with another owner. 



First Offense/Running Deer, or 
Killing Deer or Domesticated 
Animal (s) 



punishable by a $100 fine. A public 
hearing shall be held by the Board 
of Selectmen on each complaint. 



Second Offense/Running Deer, or 
Killing Deer or Domesticated 
Animal(s) 



punishable by the maximum fine per- 
missable per MGL, Ch40, Section 21 
and destruction of the dog or place- 
ment with another owner. A public 
hearing shall be held by the Board 
of Selectmen on each complaint;" 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 



Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, Chapter XV, Section 5(b) by deleting the same in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following: "(b) Notwithstanding the provisions 
of paragraph (a) above, and of Chapter 140, Section 173A of the General Laws, the 
final disposition of each case shall be in accordance with the following sched- 



ule: First Offense 

Second Offense 
Third Offense 
Fourth Offense 

First Offense/Running Deer, or 
Killing Deer or Domesticated 
Animal (s) 

Second Offense/Runing Deer, or 
Killing Deer or Domesticated 
Animal (s) 



punishable by a "Dismissal on Ap- 
pearance" 

punishable by a $25 fine 
punishable by a $30 find 
punishable by a $50 fine 

punishable by a $100 fine. A public 
hearing shall be held by the Board 
of. Selectmen on each complaint 

punishable by the maximum fine per- 
missable per MGL, Ch40, Section 21, 
and destruction of the dog or place- 
ment with another owner. A public 
hearing shall be held by the Board 
of Selectmen on each complaint." 



Seconded. Board of Selectmen supported the article; Finance Committee recom- 
mended. Chief Brouillette felt it was illegal according to Chapter 140, Section 



-27- 



173A, as to the fine and thought the By-Law should be left the way it is. Acting 
Town Counsel Allen Swan ruled that the present motion was in violation and Mr. 
Player modified it to read: "First offense running deer, or killing deer or 
domesticated animal (s) punishable by a $50 fine. A public hearing shall be held 
by the Board of Selectmen on each complaint. Second offense running deer, or 
killing deer or domesticated animal(s) punishable by a $50 fine, and destruction 
of the dog or placement with another owner. A public hearing shall be held by 
the Board of Selectmen on each complaint." Animal Control Officer Harry Leno 
moved to amend the main motion by deleting under "First Offense 1 the phrase "Dis- 
missal upon Appearance" and insert "$10.00 fine", so that the revision reads 
"First Offense punishable by a $10.00 fine". Seconded. Voice vote inconslusive; 
hand count, 95 in favor, 135 against; amendment defeated. Mrs. Dorman felt that 
the phrase "placed with another owner" left a loophole so that the dog could be 
put next door, across Town, or out of Town. Robert Weatherall felt that there 
should be a provision so that a dog owner could appeal a severe penalty to the 
District Court. Mr. Swan replied that the State law does not have such a provi- 
sion. With reference to Mrs. Dorman' s remarks, Mr. Player moved that in the 
final paragraph, first sentence of the main motion, after the words "with another 
owner" the words "in a location outside of the Town of Ipswich" be added. Sec- 
onded. The amendment carried on a voice vote. The voice vote on the motion was 
not clear; on the hand count 117 voted in favor, 79 opposed; motion carried. 

Article 38 » To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or to transfer 
from available funds a sum of money to obtain professional services to conduct a 
feasibility study and design of a water filtration facility for Dow Brook Reser- 
voir and/or Bull Brook Reservoir and to obtain any and all materiel and services 
necessary or incidental thereto; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

James Engel moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $75,000 from the 
Water Division surplus account to obtain professional sevices to conduct a feasi- 
bility study and design of a water filtration facility for Dow Brook Reservoir 
and/or Bull Brook Reservoir and to obtain any and all materiel and services nec- 
essary or incidental thereto. Seconded. Mr. Engel, Chairman of the Water Supply 
Committee and the Aquifer Committee, explained what this would mean to the Town 
regarding its water supply. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Louis Balboni spoke against the article, Clarence Dupray in favor. 
Question moved, seconded, carried. Moton carried on unanimous voice vote. 

The hour being late, Mr. Craft moved that the Meeting adjourn until Monday, April 
25, 1983 at 7:30 at the High School. Seconded. So voted. 

At 7:30 p.m. on April 25th there was no quorum present. After several postpone- 
ments, a quorum was reached at 8:30 p.m. and the Moderator called the Meeting to 
order. The final count was 368. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: Charles Bay ley, Wynne Fahey, Patrick 
McNally, James Barney, Stanley Eustace, Allen Swan. 

Article 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or to trans- 
fer from available funds a sum of money to conduct prolonged pump testing and to 
obtain professional services for surveying, appraising, and conducting prelimi- 
nary design for a new municipal well; or to take any other action relative there- 
to. 

Mr. Damon moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of surveying, designing, construction, and obtaining related ma- 
teriel or services for the extension of the sanitary sewer system in the area of 

-28- 



Spring Street, Highland Avenue, and East Street or any portion thereof; to autho- 
rize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest (s) as 
may be necessary to effectuate said extensions of the sanitary sewer system by 
purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; to determine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds, or 
otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $128,000 
for the purpose of surveying, designing, construction, and obtaining related ma- 
teriel or services for the extension of the sanitary sewer system in the area of 
Spring Street, Highland Avenue, and East Street, or any portion thereof; and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other inter- 
est (s) as may be necessary to effectuate said extensions of the sanitary sewer 
system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise. Seconded. This 
will hopefully eliminate the flow of sewerage from this area to the river; the 
cost per square foot of frontage should be about $19. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 41 . To see if the Town will vote to rescind its acceptance or to abandon 
as public ways portions of the following roads: 

(a) That portion of Old England Road beginning at a point at the extension of 
the Southeasterly lot line of land of Roland J. and Edith A. Kelley (Assessor's 
Map 42D, Parcel 5), thence to Labor-In-Vain Creek, a distance of 1800 feet more 
or less, which layout previously was approved by the Board of Selectmen on March 
19, 1681; and 

(b) That portion of Pineswamp Road beginning at a point at the extension of the 
Northerly-most lot line of land of Dick G. Adams (Assessor's Map 40, Parcel 3) 
thence Northerly and Easterly a distance of 1.9 miles, more or less, to the 
intersection of Pineswamp Road and Linebrook Road abutting land of the Town of 
Ipswich (Assessor's Map 29C, Parcel 3D and land of Roland F. and Cynthia L. 
Sheppard (Assessor's Map 29C, Parcel 291), which layout previously was accepted 
by the September 04, 1854, Town Meeting; or to take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Mr. LeClair moved that the Town vote to discontinue as public ways and as Town 
ways, the following portions of the following roads: (a) That portion of the 
Way known as Old England Road beginning at a point at the extension of the South- 
easterly lot line of land of Roland J. and Edith A. Kelley (Assessor's Map 42D, 
Parcel 5), thence to Labor-In-Vain Creek, a distance of 1800 feet more or less, 
which way previously was approved by the Board of Selectmen on March 19, 1681; 
and (b) That portion of the Way known as Pineswamp Road beginning at a point at 
the extension of the Southerly-most lot line of land of Dick G. Adams (Assessor's 
Map 40, Parcel 3), thence Northerly and Easterly a distance of 1.9 miles, more or 
less, to the intersection of Pineswamp Road and Linebrook Road abutting land of 
the Town of Ipswich (Assessor's Map 29C, Parcel 3D, and land of Roland F. and 
Cynthia L. Sheppard (Assessor's Map 29C, Parcel 29D , which Way previously was 
accepted by the September 04, 1854, Town Meeting. Seconded. Old England Road is 
overgrown and impassable, Pineswamp Road is very narrow. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee recommended. Mr. Harkness stated the Planning Board has has 
problems with developers on these roads and recommended acceptance. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 42. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 71 F 
of Chapter 71 of the General Laws, as inserted by Chapter 43 of the Acts of 1982, 
to establish separate accounts for non-resident student tuition, and for reim- 
bursements for students who are foster care children, and to direct that said 
accounts be established and administered in accordance with said Section 71 F; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. 



-29- 



Mr. Thompson moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 71F of 
Chapter 71 of the General Laws, as inserted by Chapter 43 of the Acts of 1982, to 
establish separate accounts for non-resident student tuition, and for reimburse- 
ments for students who are foster care children, and to direct that said accounts 
be established and administered in accordance with said Section 71 F. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or to trans- 
fer from available funds, a sum of money to survey, design, and construct an ex- 
tension of the water distribution system in the vicinity of Kimball Street and 
Hayward Street, or any portion thereof; to change the purpose of the remaining 
balance of money appropriated under Article 22 of the April 06, 1981 Annual Town 
Meeting from "design of improvements to the water supply and distribution system" 
to "construction of mains"; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
such easements and/or other interests as may be necessary to effectuate said ex- 
tensions of the water distirbution system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent do- 
main, or otherwise; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, 
and to expend any and all federal or state grants or private gifts in conjunction 
with the aforesaid purposes; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to transfer from the Water Division Surplus 
Account the sum of $53,700 to survey, design, and construct an extension of the 
water distribution system in the vicinity of Kimball Street and Hayward Street, 
or any portion thereof; to change the purpose of the remaining balance of money 
appropriate under Article 22 of the April 06, 1981 Annual Town Meeting from "de- 
sign of improvements to the water supply and distrubtion system" to "construction 
of mains"; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/ 
or other interests as may be necessary to effectuate said extensions of the water 
distribution system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; and 
to authorize the Board of Select emen to apply for, accept, and to expend any and 
all federal or state grants or private gifts in conjunction with the aforesaid 
purposes. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unani- 
mous voice vote. 

Article 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or to trans- 
fer from available funds, a sum of monies to renovate and repair the municipal 
highway garage; to change the purpose of the remaining balance of money appropri- 
ated under Article 21 of the April 05, 1982, Annual Town Meeting from "design and 
construction of a sidewalk in the vicinity of Union Street: to "renovations and 
repairs of the municipal highway garage;" or to take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $35,000 to ren- 
ovate and repair the municipal highway garage and to obtain any materiel and/or 
services incidental thereto; (2) of said $35,000 that $16,553 be raised; and (3) 
that the purposes for which the indicated remaining balances of articles previ- 
ously authorized as indicated hereinbelow be changed to "renovations and repairs 
of the municiapl highway garage" and obtaining any materiel and/or services inci- 
dental thereto: 

Article 19, April 05, 1982 Annual Town Meeting (repairs to Town Hall Sills) 
$10,945 

Article 21, April 05, 1982 Annual Town Meeting (repairs to Union Street 
sidewalks) $7,502 
seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

Article 45. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
sell and convey certain parcels of land consisting of 3,600 square feet, more or 
less, and 9,040 square feet, more or less, respectively, both as shown on a plan 

-30- 



of land in Ipswich, Mass., prepared for Edward J. Sikora, Jr., scale 1" = 40' 
dated March 04, 1983, prepared by Thomas E. Neve Associates, Inc., Engineers-Sur- 
veyors-Land Use Planners, 447 Old Boston Rd., U.S. Route No. 1, Topsfield, Massa- 
chusetts; each, respectively, for a certain sum of money; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell 
and convey a parcel of land consisting of 3,600 square feet, more or less, to 
Joseph L. and Blanche B. Kmiec for a sum not less than $1 ,200 and to sell and 
convey a parcel of land consisting of 9,040 square feet, more or less, to Edward 
J. Sikora, Jr., for a sum not less than $3,000; both as shown on a plan of land 
in Ipswich, Mass., prepared for Edward J. Sikora, Jr., scale 1" = 40', dated 
March 04, 1983, prepared by Thomas E. Neve Associates, Inc., Engineers-Surveyors- 
Land Use Planners, 447 Old Boston Road, U.S. Route #1 , Topsfield, Massachusetts. 
Seconded. There is an electric substation on part of this property in the pro- 
cess of being phased out; Town does not need the land. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Commitee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 46. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
sell and convey a parcel of land consisting of 325 square feet more or less, sit- 
uate in the vicinity of the Town's water storage tank near Dix Road, to Eastern 
Essex Development Corp., said parcel being identified as Parcel 198B as shown on 
the "Plan of land in Ipswich, Mass., prepared by Raymond Engineering Service, 240 
Cambridge St., Burlington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', dated January 17, 1983"; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of mon- 
ies to install a new water main and services on Seaview Road, one-half the ex- 
pense to be reimbursed to the Town through water betterments paid by the abut- 
tors; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote: 1. To appropriate the sum of $20,500 to in- 
stall a new water main and services on Seaview Road; 2. Of said $20,500, that 
$12,010 be raised; 3. To transfer from the consolidated water improvements 
account the sum of $8,490; 4. One-half of said $20,500 expense to be reimbursed 
to the Town through water betterments paid by the abuttors. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended. The water pipe in that section is very nar- 
row; the residents have had problems for years with low pressure and winter 
freezing. Finance Committee did not recommend. Lonnie Cummings, William Rendle 
(a resident of Seaview Road), Jack Gavin (also a resident) spoke in favor. Ques- 
tion was moved, seconded, carried. On the motion, voice vote carried. 

Article 48. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate funds for fifty per- 
cent ( 50%) of the costs for the installation of an 8" cement lined ductile iron 
water main to provide service to Arrowhead Trail beginning at the intersection 
with Newmarch Street and proceeding to the point at which the public road termi- 
nates. This request is made in conjunction with Article III, Section 3 of the 
Town's Water Regulations; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By 
Petition) 

Douglas Laterowicz moved that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $27,000 
to install an 8" cement-lined ductile iron water main to provide service to 
Arrowhead Trail beginning at the intersection with Newmarch Street and proceeding 
to the point at which the public road terminates; one-half of said $27,000 ex- 
pense to be reimbursed to the Town through water betterments paid by the abut- 
tors. Seconded. Mr. Laterowicz is planning a subdivision at the end of Arrow- 
head Trail; the present water main on the Trail is 1£"; an 8" pipe is needed. 

-31- 



Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, both claiming that this was the first time 
they had received any information on the article (the petitioner did not attend 
hearings) and that no residents of Arrowhead Trail had signed his petition or 
complained of the water system, recommended against the article. Question was 
moved, seconded, carried. Motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

The Moderator asked Mr. Howe to speak on reconsideration, stating that while, 
historically, the Town Meeting has not reconsidered articles, he felt this matter 
was a special one. The Town Manager moved that the Town vote to reconsider its 
action under Article 6. Seconded. Mr. Howe explained that the Town had received 
notice of arbitration findings in a grievance from regular firemen who weren't 
called out during a 1982 storm, call men being used instead. The regular men had 
been awarded $535 in overtime payments they should have received. Unanimous 
voice vote. Mr. Howe then moved that the Town amend its action under Article 6 
to the extent that the sum to be transferred from Free Cash to pay unpaid bills 
incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid be increased from $1,890.71 to 
$2,425.71 to pay $535 in Fire Department wages. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 49. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
notify in writing President Ronald Regan, Senator Edward Kennedy, Senator Paul 
Tsongas and U.S. Representative Nicholas Mavroules that it is the desire of the 
voters at the Annual Town Meeting, that the aforementioned elected officials use 
their constitutionally mandated authority and influence to reduce the potential 
for nuclear war; 

1. By reducing or eliminating the sale, licensing or transfer of American tech- 
nology, supplies and hardware to the Soviet Union and other communist countries; 
and 

2. By terminating all programs and agreements whereby our nation provides 
loans, credits, guarantees and rescheduling of debts with and to all communist 
nations; or take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Mr. Pszenny moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. (The petitioner was 
not present to present the article and speak on it.) Voice vote carried. 

Article 50. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purchase of a new school bus; or to take any other action relative there- 
to. 

Mrs. Marjorie Robie moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 51 ♦ To see if the Town will vote: 

1 . To raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire a parcel of land now or 
formerly owned by GTE Products Corp., in the vicinity of Estes and Peatfield 
Streets, consisting of 1.98 acres, more or less (Essex South Registry of Deeds, 
Book 5880, Page 0556), for vehicular parking; 

2. To authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, to accept, and to expend 
any Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned 
purposes, or to authorize said application to be filed by the Cape Ann Transit 
Authority for said purposes; and 

3. To authorize said acquisition of land and/or any easements necessary and in- 
cidental thereto by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote: 1. To raise and appropriate the sum of 
$75,000 to acquire a parcel of land now or formerly owned by GTE Products Corp., 
in the vicinity of Estes and Peatfield Street, consisting of 1.98 acres, more or 
less (Essex South Registry of Deeds, Book 5880, Page 0556), for vehicular park- 
ing; 2. To authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, to accept, and to ex- 

-32- 



pend any Federal and /or State grants which may be available for the aforemen- 
tioned purposes, or to authorize said application to be filed by the Cape Ann 
Transit Authority for said purposes; and 3. To authorize said acquisition of land 
and/or any easements necessary and incidental thereto by purchase, gift, lease, 
eminent domain, or otherwise. Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously recom- 
mended. This is the last piece of property in the downtown area that could be 
used to alleviate the parking problem. Finance Committee recommended; Commuter 
Rail Committee recommended. Mrs. Endicott spoke in favor and suggested that 
local merchants might build a platform and shelter there. Chamber of Commerce 
recommended article. Voice vote was inconclusive; on the hand count, 295 voted 
affirmatively, 17 in the negative; motion carried. 

Article 52. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
to be added to the stabilization fund; or to take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $163,000 
to be added to the Stabilization Fund. Seconded. Board of Seledctmen, Finance 
Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the 1983 Annual Town Meeting be dissolved. Seconded. 
Voice vote carried. (9:37 p.m.) 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up attested copies thereof 
at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, by publication 
seven days at least prior to the time for holding said meeting, in a newspaper 
published in, or having a general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this twenty-first day of March in the year of our Lord, One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty-Three. 

Lawrence J. Pszenny, Chairman David S. Player 

Edwin H. Damon, Jr. William E. George 

Arthur S. LeClair 



-33- 



****** 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

David S. Player, Jr., Chairman 

The membership of the Board remained during 1 983 as it had the previous year. We 
did, however, elect a new Chairman to replace Larry Pszenny who retired from the 
chairmanship after presiding for one year. 

Despite Proposition 2i, we have been able to operate successully through FY84, 
and have presented a budget for Town Meeting approval for FY85 which will contin- 
ue to provide the essential services which have always been enjoyed in the past, 
and in some instances, we have expanded on some services. 

As your Electric Commissioners, we as a Board have continued to focus our atten- 
tion toward improving not only the Department's efficiency both financially and 
operationally, but also it's accountability to you as rate payers. Special 
thanks must be given to Larry Pszenny who, as Acting Manager, played a critical 
role in turning this Department around, and as a result of his involvement, we 
will be moving forward on much more stable ground in the future. 

Improving the water quality as well as the quantity continues to be an ongoing 
concern of the Board. Through the efforts of the Water Supply Committee, we are 
going to be presenting to the voters of Ipswich a proposal which we feel will 
help correct our water quality problem, and also will offer some alternatives 
for expansion to accommodate future growth. 

We as a Board, extend our sincerest thanks and appreciation to the many people 
who have donated their time and dedication while serving on various Town Boards. 
Because of their contributions and the cooperation of the Town Manager, Finance 
Committee, Town Department Heads and Town Employees, our job as Selectmen has 
been made that much easier and the decisions that we make are made with a greater 
understanding of the situation, and hopefully the impact of those decisions are, 
and continue to be, positive. 

****** 

TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

In the past year considerable attention was given to general administrative and 
financial management activities. For example, the decennial effort to edit and 
update the Charter, By-Laws, and legislative acceptances was commenced; those 
documents and all the Town's regulations are being placed on a new word processor. 
A new payroll service was evaluated and hired, and a new computer system was 
studied and recommended. We have joined two insurance collaboratives, enabling 
extended coverages and short savings. Our fiscal health was evaluated in a UMass 
study, and six-year capital planning was introduced. 

Much time was devoted as well in the area of land use development. A CARD dis- 
trict was established, facilitating an IDFA bond issue for reconstruction of the 
Dick/Hart building. Following the adoption of aquifer zoning, I worked closely 
with the Planning Board to develop special permit procedures, and a process to 
streamline coordination of the review of proposed subdivisions. New, more re- 
strictive, gravel regulations were drafted, and a policy was developed to explain 
the extent of Town services which are and will be provided on unaccepted streets. 

In utility management, quarterly billing was reinstituted for the Water and Sewer 
Divisions, and a collection policy was drafted for the Electric Department. The 

-34- 



1983 Electric budget was re-formatted for ease of review by the Electric Commis- 
sioners and, formally for the first year, the Finance Committee. Grants were 
sought for the Spring Street sewer extension and for residential water conserva- 
tion devices, both were awarded. TV camera inspection and repair technology was 
introduced for maintenance of our sewer lines. And a feasibility study for water 
filtration plant was undertaken. 

Work also continued on planning for and implementation of infrastructure mainte- 
nance and expansions: water main replacements, bridge repairs, road reconstruc- 
tion, sidewalk repairs, a new roof for the highway garage and windows for the 
Town Hall, acquisition from GTE Sylvania of a lot for commuter parking, an addi- 
tion to the Library, and a major initiative to correct deficiencies in our vari- 
ous drainage systems of brooks and culverts. 

As the year closed, the Town emerged in excellent financial condition. It has 
been a pleasure working in town to make Ipswich such a desirable community. 

****** 



ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of the Town January 01, 1983, was $300,706,450 representing 
an increase of $6,632,290 over the previous year. 

The total valuation of the Town by classification is: 



Class 1 Residential 
Class 2 Open Space 
Class 3 Commercial 
Class 4 Industrial 
Personal Property 



$260,252,860 



29,459,980 

5,737,570 

5,256,040 



The Tax Rate of $19.25 for Fiscal Year 1984 was an increase of $.25 per thousand 
dollars from Fiscal Year 1983. 



****** 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Charles W. Turner, Jr. 

The following is a synopsis of the building construction in 1 983: 



RESIDENTIAL 



Number Dwelling Units 
Additions/Alterations to Dwelling Units 
Structures Other Than Dwelling Units 

(Include Pools/In or Above Ground) 
Manufactured Items 



COMMERCIAL 



Number Commercial Units 
Additions/Alterations to Commercial Units 
Manufactured Items 



TOTALS 



Number of Permits Issued 
Permit Fees Collected 
Estimated Construction Costs 



AMOUNT 

38 

144 


ESTIMATED COST 
$2,324,288 
1,061,363 


63 
62 


382,897 
67,654 


8 

33 

18 


708,958 

648,858 

6,470 


388 


17,800 
5,224,738 



-35- 



Number of Occupancy Permits Issued 75 375 

Certificates of Inspection 38 1,555 

****** 

CEMETERIES, PARKS AND BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 
James E. Graff urn, Director 

General grounds maintenance was performed in all Town Cemeteries and playgrounds. 
A new section of single and double grave lots was developed for future use. 
Ninety tons of asphalt was applied to Northern and Spruce Avenues in the New 
Highland Cemetery. Thirty-five tons of infield material was spread at the base- 
ball and softball fields at Bialek Park. 

There were 111 interments in 1 983 • There were two-single grave, eight-two grave 
and two-four grave lots awarded to Veterans. There were four-single grave, nine- 
two grave, four-four grave and one-eight grave lots sold. 

Also there were 18 Government plaques set, five sets of posts set, 2H monument 
foundations dug and poured, plus 33 markers dug and poured. 

The following are 1983 receipts of the Cemeteries, Parks and Buildings Depart- 
ment: Chapel Tent Rentals $ 810 

Sale of Lots 1 , 750 

Foundations 2,3^3 

Perpetual Care 2,925 

Interment Openings 10,295 = $18,123 

****** 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

David R. Clements, Director 

With the passing of the year, we mourn a tremendous loss with the passing of our 
Director, John R. Harrigan. John was Director of Civil Defense for thirteen 
years. It was through his hard work and devotion to the Town of Ipswich that 
made this Civil Defense Department one of the best in the State, for the size of 
the community. John, and his involvement in Civil Defense and other Town Depart- 
ments, will long be remembered by the people of Ipswich and surrounding communi- 
ties of the North Shore. 

The year of 1983 was an active one for Civil Defense. This Department stands 
ready and capable to assist in any emergency. 

One division under the direction of Civil Defense is the Auxiliary Police. This 
group of volunteer men and women continue to be involved in many training pro- 
grams. These programs include Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (C.P.R.), First Re- 
sponded s classes and qualifying with firearms. In addition, the members have 
taken courses with the Criminal Justice Training Council, presented by experts in 
their field. These classes were given at the State Civil Defense Training Acade- 
my in Topsfield. This course of forty hours gave extra training to the Auxiliary 
Police in public relations, communications, qualification with firearms and crowd 
control. It is with these programs that the Ipswich Auxiliary Police have become 
one of the finest. 

Also in 1983, the Ipswich Civil Defense joined ranks in the North Shore Civil De- 
fense Council. Here we pool all of our resources and aid each other in times of 
emergency. The Directors of each city and town which form this council, meet 
once a month in host communities. 

-36- 



This year we received a license from the F.C.C. to operate on the High Frequency 
of 153.875 MHZ. This gives us a radio frequency of our own and it is linked with 
the North Shore Council. This was a very big step for our Communications Divi- 
sion. This Division is interested in recruiting new members who must be knowl- 
edgeable in radio communications. 

Having been appointed Director in the fall of 1983, I was busy updating the Fall- 
out Shelter Program in conjunction with Area I Director William B. Linehan. It 
is one of my goals to recruit new members to all phases of Civil Defense. 

In closing I would like to say that 1983 was a productive year for this Depart- 
ment, and I am looking forward to a more productive year for 1984. I would like 
to thank all those who made 1983 such a successful and productive year. 

Our emergency operating center, located in the Middle School, is staffed every 
Monday night from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and is open to the citizens of Ipswich. 

****** 

COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Dorcas Rice, Chairman 

On January 10, 1983, the Ipswich Commuter Rail Committee added a chapter to local 
history with a letter to Mr. John C. Avallon, President of GTE Sylvania Electric- 
al Products Group, Danvers. In it we inquired into the possibility of Sylvania 
either selling, leasing, or lending to the Town, for use as a parking lot, their 
large vacant lot on Topsfield Road by the railroad crossing. Our Committee had 
discussed the feasibility of this site and had toured it in the late autumn of 
1982, and we felt it ideally situated and adaptable (with minimum expenditure). 

Therefore, with everything to gain and nothing to lose, we eagerly tested the 
water. To our immense pleasure, Sylvania responded affirmatively to Town Manager 
George Howe, and the Selectmen voted to place an article on the Town Meeting War- 
rant authorizing the Town to purchase the lot either outright or through federal 
funding. The Committee unanimously supported the article and it readily passed 
at Town Meeting. Negotiations are still proceeding, and it is our hope that dur- 
ing 1984 the deal will be finalized (finally!), and the parking situation for 
commuters, shoppers and businesses downtown will be vastly improved. 

In January we also undertook a three week survey and updated head count of the 
Ipswich ridership. We found the average daily ridership on weekdays to be a 
healthy 248. All riders surveyed expressed the crying need for more parking 
facilities. 

Other than this, it has been a quiet year on the rails, with service running 
smoothly by and large; of course, there have been occasional breakdowns and de- 
lays, but these keep the commuter alert and free of moribund complacency. 

I cannot detail, in this 1 983 report, the fireworks of January, 1984 that have 
brought havoc to commuter life, but mention of it will perhaps whet the appetite 
for next year's report! 

****** 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Chairman 

The Ipswich Conservation Commission is a non-paid, seven-member official Town 
body, with associate membership. Commmission members are appointed by the Town 

-37- 



Manager and confirmed by the Board of Selectmen. Each member serves for a 
period of three years. 

The Ipswich Conservation Commission is specifically charged with responsibility 
of protecting the Town of Ipswich's natural resources in the inland fresh waters 
and coastal (salt waters) regions according to Chapter 131, Section 40 of the 
Wetlands Protection Act, Massachusetts General Laws enacted in 1957, filed by 
then Representative John Dolan of Ipswich. 

As of April 01, 1983 , new and more stringent rules and regulations were adopted 
both for conservation commissions and property owners. One new rule places the 
burden of proving a site is not situated in wetland or within the buffer zone of 
a wetland in the hands of the property owner. On the plus side for the property 
owner, access cannot be denied to a person's land although rigid and strict rules 
must be adhered to regarding the natural flow of water. New, more comprehensive 
but easier to understand forms have been adopted, along with detailed instruc- 
tions. This is a major asset to the property owner contemplating construction in 
or near wetlands. 

The number of cases administered to and enforced by the Conservation Commission 
is still increasing. Bi-weekly meetings have prevailed and on-site inspections 
take place on an average of two or more every other week. 

The Conservation Commission is a dedicated group, all members having spent many 
hours of their time working in behalf of preserving the wetlands of Ipswich. The 
Commission is deeply appreciative of the support of its secretary, of various 
Town Boards, and of the citizens of Ipswich. 

****** 

COUNCIL ON AGING 
Winfred Hardy, Chairman 

This year has been one of frustration for the Council. First of all we were 
forced out of our quarters at 16 Central Street and had to re-locate at 42 
Central. These new quarters, although much larger and more appropriate for the 
Council, were in deplorable condition. However, now it has been thoroughly re- 
painted and will be refurnished. As a consequence of the above, we have been 
rather limited in our activities. 

During the past year, we have continued to display and sell for our elderly their 
handiwork in various crafts. This has proven to be a good financial help to 
them. 

We are still continuing our blood pressure clinic every Wednesday from 10:30 a.m. 
to 12:00 noon. We are deeply indebted to our nurse, Mrs. Carmen Hebbel, who has 
given of her time so generously over the past few years. 

Now that we are firmly settled in our new quarters, we will endeavor to have 
many new programs for the benefit of the Town's 2,000 elders. 

****** 

DOG AND ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 
Harry W. Leno, Jr. 

A well deserved appreciation for the Ipswich Humane Group, for their positive 
strides in creating a strong and viable community adoption outreach program. 



-38- 



The Ipswich Humane Group has been loyal, dedicated and supportive of all the in- 
carcerated animals at the pound. 

A persistent column in the local newspaper has been established; this column has 
covered the growing need for domesticated pet and wildlife responsibility for the 
community. Also accomplished has been the overall improvement of the quality of 
the day-to-day life of those animals living in the pound, and the constant value 
clarification and upgrading of the community's awareness of their responsibili- 
ties toward their pets and surrounding animals. 

During 1 983 there were: 



Complaints Received 




2,664 


Complaints Invest: 


L gated 




2,562 


Dog Bites 








31 


Animals Killed 


By Dogs 




26 


Animals Killed 


By 


Cars 




114 


Dogs Picked Up 








232 


Animals Found 








296 


Dogs Disposed Of 






4 


Dogs Returned To ( 


Dwners 




255 


Cat Complaints 








364 


Citations 








213 


Calls Off Duty 








26 






1982 


1983 


Patrol Hours 


1, 


540 


1,648 


Licenses 




1, 


440 


1,370 


Dogs Adopted 






20 


37 


Cats Adopted 






21 


20 



****** 

ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 

Lawrence J. Pszenny, Chief Administrative Electric Commissioner 

The Department completed a successful year in 1 983 with record sales and kilowatt 
hours of energy sold. The Department operations are stable and the search con- 
tinues to fill the position for a full-time manager. The Board of Electric Com- 
missioners has spent much time with the Department's operations and power needs 
and expects to continue this attention during 1984. 

****** 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Edwin R. Emerson, Chief 

The Fire Department responded to 588 alarms (499 still and 89 bell) in 1 983 , a 
nine percent increase over 1982. Vehicle fires numbered 20; structural fires 17; 
investigations 93; medical aid 16; wood stove and chimney fires 33 (a 100$ in- 
crease); brush fires 82; gasoline washdowns 49; public assistance 144; and 79 
false or needless. There were 155 oil burner inspections, 205 smoke detector in- 
spections and 1,623 burning permits issued. 

The permanent force consists of 16 men, including the chief, and the call force 
has 36 men assigned. Training is a very vital part of the Department, and a 
widely accepted training manual has been ordered for every member. 

Abandoned gasoline tanks have been a source of concern to the Fire Department , 
and much time and energy was spent in attempts (some successful) to locate them. 

Linebrook Station came to life in 1 983 due to the countless hours of effort put 
in by the men and women of the Linebrook Fire Station Committee, callmen of that 



-39- 



area and the Town-at -large, and contributions from many merchants. The outside 
of the building was painted, a new ceiling and lighting were installed, and a 
heating system is 90% complete, purchased and installed at no cost to the Town. 
Plans are underway for aquiring a pumping engine, also at no cost to the Town. 

A total of $2,427 was collected from permits, fees and reports. Said money was 
turned in to the General Fund. 

GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Connie Surpitski, Chairman 

The Government Study Committee began 1983 by reviewing and making a recommen- 
dation on a Warrant article proposing a change in the manner in which Selectmen 
were elected. The proposed article was a citizen's petitioned article. The 
proposed article would have the Selectmen elected one from each of the four pre- 
cincts and one from the Town at large. After discussion with the author, the 
Committee voted unanimously not to support the article. 

Next the Committee began the task of proofreading the first draft of the updated 
Town Charter and By-Laws. The document is stored on a word processing disk, thus 
allowing revisions to be made easily. 

In October the Committee received a new charge from the Board of Selectmen. The 
charge contained seven items for the Committee's review. In December the Commit- 
tee sent a report to the Board of Selectmen detailing the status of our charge. 
A synopsis follows: 

1 . The Committee is to continue its efforts in proofreading and updating the 
Town Charter and By-Laws: 

STATUS: The first draft has been proofread and sent to the Town Manager. 

2. Should the Town Counsel be appointed by the Town Manager (as is now the case) 
or by the Selectmen? 

COMMENT: The Massachusetts Municipal Association said that most Town Coun- 
sels are appointed by the Selectmen or Town Manager. Of towns we contacted 
(some of which do not have a Town Manager) the majority were appointed by the 
Selectmen; however, it should be noted that the Counsels generally were large 
Boston law firms. 

3. Can an Assistant Town Counsel serve on other Town Committees or Boards? 
COMMENT: Eight towns were surveyed and only one had Assistant Town Counsels 
(full time). They were not allowed to serve on Town Committees or Boards. 
The State Ethics Commission has rendered opinions in this area. It was sug- 
gested that the Assistant Town Counsel petition the Commission directly to 
determine if a conflict of interest exists. 

4. It is requested that the Government Study Committee prepare a proposal for a 
representative town meeting. 

RESPONSE: A proposal for representative town meeting has been sent to the 
Board of Selectmen. Although considerable time was spent in preparation of 
this proposal, the Committee unanimously does not support moving from an open 
town meeting format to a representative town meeting. 

RECOMMENDED CHANGE IN THE TOWN MEETING QUORUM. An alternative to representa- 
tive town meeting was proposed. It is the Committee's unanimous recommenda- 
tion that the By-Laws (Chapter II, Section 4. Quorum) establishing a town 
meeting quorum, which reads "five percent of the registered voters", be 
changed to read "two hundred registered voters". 

5. Please comment on the suggestion that town meeting article numbers be placed 
on ping pong balls, placed in a basket, and selected at random for considera- 
tion of Town Meeting participants. 

-40- 



RECOMMENDATION: It is recommended that the Town try selecting town meeting 
articles by placing the article number(s) on ping pong balls for random 
selection out of a basket. Further, it is recommended that certain stock 
articles, like the operating and school budgets, etc., be fixed as the first 
articles to be addressed before going to the random selection of the remain- 
ing articles. 

6. How should multiple articles on one subject be handled at Town Meeting to 
minimize confusion? 

RECOMMENDATION: There is no simple answer to this question, each situation 
should be looked at individually. 

7. The Town Manager is currently drafting a proposed Capital Planning process 
and he would like the Government Study Committee to review same when it is 
ready . 

COMMENT: This remains an open item. The Committee has not received a copy 
of the Capital Plan for review at this time. 

****** 

HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 
Vivian Endicott, Chairman 

The Hall-Haskell House has been secure from summer rains and winter snows while 
the Committee has been working for foundation grants to continue the work. 

Persistence will win, even though competition is strong. We hope to have news 
of success for the Town Meeting. 

****** 

HARBORMASTER 
Michael Holland 

This past season was the start of the foundation for Ipswich's Waterways policy. 
It is a policy which will provide for the utilization and preservation of our 
natural resource. It is a policy which will provide for the safety and protec- 
tion of everyone using our waters. 

The Harbormaster's position is primarily the patrol of the Ipswich Waterways. 
Under state law the Harbormaster and appointed Deputy Harbormasters are the 
police department of the Ipswich Waterways. This law enforcement is to protect 
people ON the water and IN the water and covers all of the extensive Ipswich 
waterways . 

The second major responsibility of the Harbormaster designated by the state is 
the mooring of all boats, rafts, and floats. This mooring program is the corner- 
stone of an orderly harbor and the protection of property. It also helps to en- 
sure that the boats using the Ipswich Waterways are in compliance with the law 
which includes payment of excise tax and valid registration. 

There are many people to thank for their help but especially: our boating neigh- 
bors for lending boats and equipment during emergencies; the officers of the 
Police Department (who went out of their way to help); the people at Town Hall 
(who explained the bureaucratic process) especially Connie Chisholm, Jaye 
(Farquhar) Clark and Frank Ragonese; Russ Grant and John "Kaki" Costopoulos (for 
their assistance and advice); and to the Ipswich boaters for being so supportive, 

We look forward to a safe season in 1984! 

****** 



-41- 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 
Joseph Giancola, Agent 

1983 has been a year of consistent expansion in the area of Board of Health re- 
sponsibility and involvement into areas of public health and environmental con- 
cerns . 

Clerical services remained at 1/5th time, necessitating pleas for volunteer help; 
particularly with minutes of Board of Health monthly meetings, and associated 
correspondence . 

Basic areas of enforcement have been: Public Health codes, Sanitation, Septic, 
and Trash route inspections. 

The trash collection contract being administered has been pleasantly devoid of 
major complaint by residents. 

The Solid Waste Transfer Station has had a year of steadily improving conditions. 
The site on Town Farm Road received a beaut if icat ion award this year. 

Various clinics have been conducted. The biologicals/ vaccines depot has been 
maintained for physicians. 

Annual Rabies Clinic, sponsored by the physicians' National Society of Veterinary 
College Scholarship Fund, was held at the Town Garage. Several Influenza clinics 
were held for senior citizens, a total of 450 doses of vaccine were administered. 

Forty-eight Food Service Permits, 47 Disposal Works Construction or Repair Per- 
mits, 150 Plumbing, and 120 Gas Permits were issued. 

The Board of Health meets on the first Monday evening of each month, unless 
otherwise posted. 

Board members Ms. Constance Surpitski (Chairperson) and Mr. David Carleton, wel- 
comed the addition of Dr. Kenneth Zinn this year. Dr. Zinn was appointed to re- 
place Ms. Barbara DiBennedetto who relocated due to professional transfer. 

The following is a synopsis of work performed by Normand J. Bedard, Sealer of 

Weights and Measures during 1 983: 

Scales and balances adjusted, tested and sealed 91 

Avoirdupois weights, Apothecary and Metric weights tested and sealed 71 

Scales and balances not sealed 4 

Gasoline pumps tested and sealed 68 

Gasoline pumps adjusted before sealing 6 

Gasoline pumps tested and not sealed 1 

Oil truck meters tested and sealed 5 

Oil truck meters tested and not sealed 1 

Bulk oil tank meter sealed 1 

Bulk storage oil tank meter adjusted before sealing (as above) 1 

Leather measuring machine tested and sealed 1 

Number of breads reweighed and checked for correct weight 40 

Number of breads reweighed and found incorrect 5 

Number of oil trucks inspected for liquid heating oil 6 

Number of oil truck meters not sealed and warning issued 1 

Meats reweighed for correct weight and price 30 

Meats reweighed and found incorrect 5 

Turkeys reweighed for correct weight and price 80 

Turkeys reweighed and found incorrect 15 

Turkeys reweighed, as above, corrected, repriced 15 

-42- 



Drug store balances tested and sealed 3 

Drug store apothecary and metric weights tested and sealed 71 

Platform scales, over 10,000 lbs tested and rejected 2 

Platform scales, as above, condemned then repaired/tested and sealed 1 

The system of Unit Pricing checking was done at supermarkets during 1983 - This 

system of checking is done to make certain that the prices on the orange tags on 

the store shelves correspond with the prices on the articles sold; along with 
the price per pound and total sales price. 

Sealing fees received and paid to the Town Treasurer: $1,160.00 

****** 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Mary P. Conley, Chairman 

The Historical Commission during the past year was awarded a $2,500 grant by the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission from funds provided by the U.S. Department of 
the Interior, National Park Service, for the purpose of carrying out a project 
which would survey and inventory the historic buildings and sites in two areas of 
Town which have not been studied previously by the Commission. Those areas are 
the "Ipswich Village" extending from the High Street Bridge to the Rowley line 
and the contiguous streets, and the Linebrook neighborhoods extending from the 
beginning of Linebrook Road at Lord's Square to the Topsfield line. Both areas 
are rich with historically and architecturally important buildings, and the pro- 
ject is providing analytical and photographic documentation of the present condi- 
tion and use of about 100 properties. 

The Commission appointed Edward Zimmer and Anne Grady, preservation consultants, 
to carry out the work of the project. As an outgrowth of the inventory, the con- 
sultants are expected to make recommendations to the Commission for nominations 
to the National Register of Historic Places and for Preservation Agreements with 
the Commission. The project is expected to be completed by March 15, 1984. 

A growing concern of the Commission has been the problem of historically impor- 
tant houses being destroyed and lost to the community. The current inventory 
brought to the Commission's attention the fact that such a house was about to be 
bull-dozed. The Commission sought a delay so that a potential buyer could be 
found. Whether we have succeeded in saving the house remains to be seen, but in 
the anxious process, the Commission became keenly aware of its lack of authority 
to prevent demolition and also of the community's need of a private organization 
that could step in with sufficient funds to hold a house until all suitable 
arrangements could be made - in the way that the Ipswich Heritage Trust saved so 
many threatened properties in the past quarter century. 

****** 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Tone Kenney, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority, organized under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
121-B, had some internal problems in the past year. The Authority, however, con- 
tinued to provide safe, decent and sanitary housing with many ancillary services 
for 334 households of approximately 670 residents through the following projects: 

Agawam Village Elderly, Project 667-4, built in 1979, contains 80 apartments, 
eight of which are designed for wheelchair maneuverability. These are all elec- 
tric apartments, and tenants pay 25$ of their adjusted gross income for rent and 

-43- 



utilities. The development includes such amenities as laundry rooms and a din- 
ing-recreation hall and a small multi-purpose building with a greenhouse attach- 
ment. 

Agawam Village Family, Project 705-1, built in 1979, contains 14 apartments for 
low income families: two-four bedroom units; eight-three bedroom units; and 
four-two bedroom units. These are all electric utilities with full basements and 
individual yard areas. Tenants pay 25% of their adjusted gross income for rent 
and utilities. 

Southern Heights, Veteran's Project 200-1, built in 1950, consisting of two-four 
bedroom apartments; eight-three bedroom apartments and 14-two bedroom apartments. 
These may be assigned to low income families who do not have veteran's status 
when there are no veteran's on the waiting lists. Tenants pay 17% of their ad- 
justed income for shelter rent and pay for their own utilities. 

Southern Manor, Project 667-C2, built in 1957, consists of 20-one bedroom apart- 
ments designed for elderly or handicapped individuals. Tenants here can share in 
the amenities provided at the adjacent Agawam Village. Rents are based on 25% of 
a tenant's adjusted gross income and includes all utilities. 

Whittier Park, Project 667-C2, built in 1968. It consists of 100-one bedroom 
units for elderly or handicapped tenants. The estate provides a variety of sup- 
portive services including T.V. room, library, recreation-dining hall and laun- 
dry. Tenants pays 25% of their adjusted gross income for rent which includes all 
utilities. 

There are two Rental Assistance Programs administered by the Housing Authority: 

( 1 ) Chapter 707 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth enable subsidies for 
80 low income families and individuals who live in privately owned apartments 
while paying 25% of their income for rent and utilities. The Authority makes 
up the difference between that amount and the fair market rental for the tene- 
ment. This allows low income families to remain in their own homes while help- 
ing property owners by assuring them of a fair return on their investment. 

(2) There are an additional 16 units of Federally Subsidized units provided 
through Section 8 of the Housing Act of 1 9^9 as amended. These are adminis- 
tered similarly to the state's program except that tenants pay 30% of their ad- 
justed income for rent. Apartments under this program may be leased in certain 
participating communities outside of Ipswich. 

The Authority sponsors subsidized congregate lunch programs for the elderly at 
both Whittier Park and Agawam Village, five days per week. The Authority also 
conducts a successful summer recreation program for resident children; and dur- 
ing 1982-1983 inaugurated an after-school program for the children of working 
mothers . 

****** 

INDUSTRICAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 
Paul R. Beswick, Chairman 

The Industrial Development Commission throughout the past few years has curtailed 
its activities substantially. The 1981 Town Meeting did not vote to furnish the 
necessary finance to develop the proposed Industrial Park off High Street at 
Mitchell Road. 

Accordingly, the Commission today limits its role to furnishing reference infor- 
mation for companies wishing to locate in Ipswich and attending seminars such as 
those sponsored by the Commonwealth on matters of Industrial Development. 

-44- 



It has been interesting throughout the past few years to watch the private devel- 
opment of an Industrial Park by Brady Construction Co., on virtually the same 
site where this Commission had proposed for the Town to build an Industrial Park 
(see also the IDC reports in previous Annual Reports). 

Although on the surface the net result appears to be about the same as was the 
IDC proposal, the implementation has had a fair measure of problems with both the 
Conservation Commission and the Planning Board. To date several lots have been 
sold, new buildings have been erected and many businesses have moved to that lo- 
cation. A few of the businesses are new to the Ipswich area. 

The Industrial Development Commission continues to be interested, wherever possi- 
ble, to see this private park meet or exceed the specifications outlined in the 
previously proposed town project. 

The Commission also will continue its function relative to attracting and devel- 
oping light, non-polluting industry to not only the Industrial Park site, but 
other appropriate locations within the Town as well. In these endeavors every 
effort is also made to maintain the character, historical significance and tra- 
dition of the Town. 

****** 

LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Gaunt, Librarian 

By year's end, it appeared as if the building program of the Library was begin- 
ning to take on form and substance. Under the leadership of Board Chairman 
Crocker Snow, the Trustees called for a thorough review and update of plans drawn 
up for an addition over six years previously. In addition, the Board responded 
to the call for input to the Town's six-year Capital Plan by approving the con- 
cept of phased construction which, at its conclusion several years hence, will 
result in a completely new addition of some 6,000 square feet, as well as inter- 
ior renovations to the existing facility. 

Phase I calls for 1,280 square feet, and it will house a little under 12,000 vol- 
umes; it is hoped that Phase I will also include the first step toward housing an 
archival center worthy of the historical importance of the Town. Bid documents 
were 95% complete the end of December; the bid process should commence in early 
February, bids received subject to favorable Town Meeting action. Preliminary 
discussions with the Town Manager, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee have 
elicited favorable response. 

In the interim, the Library completed its long-range program of building improve- 
ments by the installation of storm sash in the main reading room, and total re- 
placement of the emergency lighting system. The Children's Room was brightened 
up by a fresh coat of paint, new curtains and counter. Worn out stair and entry- 
way carpeting was replaced this year. 

The new Canon photocopier installed in July has generated unprecedented business, 
as well as increased revenues. Late in the year, the Library accepted by deed of 
gift, the law library book collection of F. Dale Vincent, thereby extending its 
reference collection into a subject area previously covered inadequately. 

During its 286 days open during 1983, the Library circulated 83,260 books, maga- 
zines and records to its borrowers; 30,404 visitors were recorded, and we an- 
swered 17,287 requests for information. The book collection grew by 2,946 for a 
new total of 64,803; 176 new recordings were added. 



-45- 



Our volunteer program continues strong, with six dedicated people who devote in 
all, 14 hours a week of their time to the Library, assisting in such activities 
as covering and repairing books and retrieval of overdue materials. 

Highlights of Friends of the Library activity included sponsoring programs for 
both adults and children (Financial Planning Seminar and the "You and Me Pup- 
pets"); purchase of passes to the Peabody Museum and Essex Institute, both of 
Salem (passes may be borrowed from the Library at no charge) and the improvement 
of the record collections. 

We've moved a step closer toward implementation of library automation now that 
better than 75% of our cataloging products are ordered via computer terminal from 
Boston Public Library's automated cataloging program. Our participation in the 
Eastern Massachsetts Regional Library System continues to expand the library re- 
sources available to our residents. 

Children's story time was expanded to three mornings a week, thereby enabling 
more than forty children ranging in age from 2\ to 5 to take part in an hour of 
literature. The operation of three separate reading programs, as well as rainy- 
day movies boosted the summer circulation to record numbers. Over 60 boys and 
girls participated. On-going, brain-teasing guessing games are widely enjoyed, 
and for mothers of pre-school children, there was a program on the reading and 
importance of nursery rhymes for this age group. Both the Children's and Young 
Adult Librarians made available books relating to school projects, and several 
visits to the library were arranged. 

If you haven't used your Library in a while, let us remind you that this is your 
information place, as well as your one-stop spot for reading material. 

****** 

MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT (ESSEX COUNTY) 
Norman R. Dobson, Superintendent 

During the past year, the Mosquito Control Project (Essex County) personnel con- 
ducted the following tasks in our member communities: larvicided a total of 
2,179 acres, removed brush clogging streams and brooks (to facilitate drainage), 
amounting to 9,445 feet. On the 22,000 acres of salt marsh, we conducted water 
management amounting to 19,741.5 square feet of marsh surface and ditched 2,508 
feet of salt marsh. Our upland ditching throughout the district was 19,553 feet. 
A total of 10,526 street drains or catchbasins were treated with Altosid to pre- 
vent mosquito breeding. Along with our mosquito abatement activities, our Pro- 
ject also deployed a total of 457 black boxes known as "Greenhead Fly Traps" 
along the shores of the salt marsh coastal region. 

We know that our program of integrated mosquito abatement is helping us to grad- 
ually reduce the mosquito nuisance. Weather and climatic conditions, of course, 
have a tremendous influence on mosquito breeding, however, despite that, great 
strides have been made and will continue to be made. Hopefully we can continue 
to count on the support of all our member communities in the future. 

The following services were performed in Ipswich in 1983: 

Salt Marsh Ditching 1,088 Feet 

Upland Ditching 2,666 Feet 

Brushing 232 Feet 

Water Management/Maintenance 900 Feet 

Larvaciding 26 Acres 

Greenhead Fly Traps 139 

Sprayed 15 Days 

-46- 



PLANNING BOARD 

James M. Warner, Chairman 

1983 was an extremely successful year for the Planning Board; primarly with re- 
spect to the Protective Zoning By-Law and to the conservation and protection of 
our water resources. A comprehensive plan developed by Metcalf & Eddy with 
assistance from the Town Water Supply/ Aquifer Study Committee limited and con- 
trolled development within critical water supply districts, thereby insuring un- 
contaminated and adequate water supplies to the Town. In addition to this, sev- 
eral other Zoning By-Law amendments were adopted: signs, dimensional and density 
regulations within the central business district, and a general prohibition of 
hazardous chemical processing or production. 

Planning Board meetings generally occurred on a weekly basis, with heavy demands 
placed on Board members and administrative staff. In addition to aquifer protec- 
tion and Zoning By-Law research, routine subdivisions, mostly small in nature 
(one and two lots), were reviewed according to the Rules & Regulations Governing 
the Subdivision of Land. There were numerous site visits, many conducted on 
weekends involving inspection of construction progress of previously approved 
subdivisions and verification of field conditions of proposed developments. 

Toward the close of 1983, a great deal of effort was made, especially by the Town 
Manager in assistance to the Board, to facilitate communication between other 
Town Boards and Departments with respect to subdivision and special permit 
approvals . 

The 1983 census puts the population of Ipswich at 11,457. Housing construction 
has increased significantly (38 single-family and two, two-family occupancy per- 
mits having been issued by the Building Inspector in 1983; this does not include 
permits issued for residential additions/alterations) owing in part to the large 
scale development at Bayside Village and River Ridge. As in the past, the Plan- 
ning Board will continue to monitor growth with a keen eye toward observing the 
goals of our "Master Plan", to preserve the traditional character and visual 
appeal of Ipswich as an historic New England coastal town. 

****** 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand R. Brouillette, Chief 

The Police Department answered a total of 9,415 complaints during the calendar 
year 1983, and made 500 arrests for various criminal violations. There were 562 
summonses served and 922 non-criminal motor vehicle citations issued. In addi- 
tion, the Department issued 1,319 parking violation tags. 

A breakdown of some incidents is as follows: 

B & E 76 Businesses Found Open 338 

Stolen Motor Vehicles 19 Recovered Motor Vehicles 21 

Stolen Boats & Motors 35 Recovered Boats & Motors 12 

Larceny 195 Robbery 1 

Domestic Complaints 56 Vandalism 311 

Committed to State Hospitals 5 Missing Persons Located 20 

Missing Persons 24 Protective Custody 91 

Assaults & Threats 134 Accident Injuries 77 

Accidents 428 Fatalities 

Sudden Unattended Deaths 11 



-47- 



The accident record this year has decreased with 428 accidents, as compared to 
533 last year; with 38 less injuries and no fatalities. We have had a continuous 
effort in this regard to try to prevent these accidents through a strict enforce- 
ment program utilizing radar and non-criminal citations as the major tool. We 
will endeavor to further decrease this rate. 

Overall, the crime statistics are lower than last year and we expect a steady de- 
crease in all categories, especially crime against property due to improved pa- 
trol procedures. 

Our staff remains the same with 21 officers and one clerk. 

There has been no change in space allotment; we will ask the 1984 Town Meeting 
to turn over the Annex to us for renovations as a Police facility. 

****** 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the following divi- 
sions: Public Works Administration, Highway, Forestry, Equipment Maintenance, 
Town Hall/Annex and Municipal Garage Building Maintenance and Snow and Ice Con- 
trol. Each division is charged with particular responsibilities relating to its 
duties. When additional manpower is required to perform specific tasks, person- 
nel are interchanged within the divisions. 

Below is a summary of the work completed by each of the Public Works Divisions. 

Snow and Ice Control 

The Public Works Divisions combine their work forces during the winter months. 
Work consists of plowing roads, hauling snow, sanding, salting roadways, filling 
sand barrels, cleaning catchbasins, clearing snow away from hydrants and answer- 
ing miscellaneous complaints. Other personnel assisting the Public Works crews 
during the height of the snow storms were from the Cemetery, Water and Sewer De- 
partments. Also utilized were the services of nine private contractors. 

Equipment Maintenance Division 
Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 

All Public Works vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Municipal Garage. At 
present there are 30 pieces of motorized equipment that must be kept in good op- 
erating condition to insure its availability when needed. Operation cost records 
showing maintenance and gas/oil expenses on each vehicle can be ascertained from 
the Public Works Administration Office in the Town Hall. Also, minor repairs and 
general servicing is done to the Police cars. 

The Equipment Maintenance Division obtained a new steam cleaner in 1983. 

Building Maintenance Division 

Fenton Costigan, Custodian 

Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the Town Hall, Annex and 

Municipal Garage throughout the year. 

Highway Division 

Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division, which is the largest in the Public Works Department, is 

charged with the maintenance and repairing of the Town's streets and drainage 

systems. The winter schedule consists mainly of Snow and Ice Control and routine 

maintenance which does not require excavations. During the other three seasons, 

-48- 



the men are kept busy with projects varying from road construction to street 
sweeping. 

Normal maintenance consists of patching streets, repairing the Town's drains and 
repairing sidewalks. Sidewalks were replaced on County Road, Washington Street 
and Central Street. A new sidewalk was put in on Linebrook Road. Curbing was 
put in on School Street, North Main Street and High Street. After the curbing 
was put in on High Street and after Essex County Gas Company had finished putting 
in new pipes, the Gas Company put in a new sidewalk. 

Drainage systems were installed on Fellows Road, Lakeman's Lane, Linebrook Road 
and at the Topsfield Road railroad crossing. Several plugged drains were 
cleared. All catchbasins in Town were cleaned. 

Guard rails were installed on Linebrook Road and on Washington Street as well as 
a fence at the entrance to the Municipal Garage. 

Town Hill and part of Argilla Road was resurfaced. North Main Street and Little 
Neck Road was hot topped. Crack sealer was put out on Topsfield Road. 

Street sweeping was performed twice a week in the downtown area from April to 
December. All Town roads and sidewalks were swept in the spring to rid them of 
winter sand deposits. 

Crosswalks, parking spaces and traffic lines were painted in the downtown areas. 
As in previous years, the crosswalks were painted green. Also, 142,239 lineal 
feet of center lines and parking lines were painted. 

Roadside mowing was done. 

All gravel roads were graded twice in 1 983 - 

The Town and the MBTA combined forces to install a new grade crossing at the 
Topsfield Road railroad crossing. 

The Highway Division purchased two new pick-up trucks and an asphalt cutter in 
1983. 

Chapter 90 : No work was done with Chapter 90 funds in 1983 because the funds 
are being saved to complete the task of straightening Linebrook Road. 

Special Articles : Winthrop Street Bridge had major repairs done to it this year, 
as well as having new guard rails installed. A new roof was put on the Municipal 
Garage. A contract was awarded for new windows for the Town Hall and they have 
been ordered. Surveys and plans are being done on the Kimball Brook. 

Forestry Division 
Robert Coraeau, Leader 

The mitigation of the Dutch Elm Disease has again been one of the principal con- 
cerns of the Forestry Division. Approximately 200 Elm trees with beetle infesta- 
tion were removed as well as Maples, Oaks, Lindens and Pines. 

Each first grade student was given an Ash tree to take, plant and care for in ob- 
servance of Arbor Day. 

The Forestry Division planted approximately 125 various types of trees around 
Town. Also, they planted several trees on High Street and Argilla Road for local 
Garden Clubs. 



-49- 



Round-up was sprayed along several miles of roadside to control brush and weeds. 
Amate was used to control the spread of poison ivy. 

Spraying was done in several areas of Town to combat Elm Bark Beetle as well as 
Gypsy Moth infestation, which was not as severe as in 1982. 

Other work performed by the Forestry Division consisted of trimming and pruning 
trees, removing limbs, cutting brush (major projects were along Kimball Brook, 
the brook off Linebrook Road and the brook off Randall Road as well as along 
several roads), roadside mowing, setting up voting booths for election and 
setting up for the Annual Town Meeting. 

t 
RECREATION/YOUTH DEPARTMENT 
Elizabeth M. Dorman , Director 

The Recreation and Youth Department continued its efforts to provide programs and 
activities for many different age groups in the Town of Ipswich. For children 
there was a continuation of the summer playground programs and swim instructions 
with shuttle-bus service for both. Several different competitions were held as 
well as field trips, tennis lessons, and other special activities such as the 
July 4th parade and field day and the Halloween parade and program. Other chil- 
dren's activities included Saturday programs in basketball and bowling, a series 
of trips and activities during school vacations, and a special needs children's 
program twice a month on Saturdays. 

The teen-age Drop-In-Center at the Memorial Building was open five nights a week 
during the summer and two week-end nights during the school year. Other youth 
activities included movies, dances, and field trips for shopping, skating, and 
skiing. 

For adults, programs in volleyball and basketball were continued on Sundays and 
evenings, and trips were organized to an ice show and a Boston Pops concert. Of- 
ferings at the Memorial Building included aerobics, dog obedience classes, and 
senior citizen line dancing. Other programs specifically for senior citizens in- 
cluded a junior high concert and trips to places such as Quincy Market, a flower 
show, and Plymouth Plantation. Sign-ups for these trips were accepted at the 
Council -On-Aging Drop-In-Center and at Golden Age Club meetings as well as the 
Recreation Office. 

Several special activities and events were also organized for family and multi- 
age groups including the Ipswich Marathon, outdoor movies at Bialek Park, an eve- 
ning skating party on the tennis courts, and an outdoor community block dance. 
Recreation Department funding helped in the continuation of the summer community 
band program. Also, a dedication ceremony was held for the newly installed fit- 
ness trail at the high school, and people who served as volunteers in recreation 
activities received certificates and small awards of appreciation. 

Beach stickers were again issued by the Recreation Department. A newly-designed, 
larger sticker improved spotting by beach personnel, and a file card system was 
initiated for all resident stickers. A total of 5,644 stickers were issued in- 
cluding those for summer residents, one-day passes, fishermen, and horse vans. 

Continued cooperation with the School Department resulted in a sharing of re- 
sources and facilities. Recreation programs were held in school gymnasiums as 
well as on school fields and tennis courts. The School Department in turn used 
fields at Bialek Park for some high school sports and the Memorial Building for 
pre-school screening, some adult education classes, and cheerleading practice. 

-50- 



Alliances also continued with other town agencies such as veterans' groups, sen- 
ior citizen groups, youth and adult sports groups, adult education, "Creative 
Venture" children's offerings, and the 350th Anniversary Committee. Some of 
these groups used the Memorial Building for meetings and registrations. 

The Recreation Commission comprised of seven members of the community and the 
Recreation Director met regularly throughout the year to discuss recreation pro- 
grams, plans, and policies. Members of the Commission frequently helped in the 
supervision of many of the Department's activites such as the Marathon, Hallow- 
een, Summer track, and vacation programs. 

The Recreation Department also continued its responsibility for scheduling the 
use of ball fields and tennis courts by individuals as well as organized youth 
and adult sports groups. A total of 453 permits were issued for Softball, and 
tennis use during the spring and summer seasons including many requests and pay- 
ments for use of lighted facilities at Bialek Park. Total recreation users for 
the year was estimated to be approximately 14,500 people based on a report that 
outlines all the various programs, services, and activities that were provided. 

****** 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Marjorie, Robie, Chairperson 

Educational reports beginning with "A Nation at Risk" have focused attention on 
excellence in education and ways to achieve it. For years, excellence has been 
a concern of school committees in Ipswich, a concern shared by the current Com- 
mittee. In addition to a writing program and a program to improve instructional 
excellence explained in the Superintendent's report, the School Committee took 
the following actions to promote excellence during 1983: 

1 . Created 33 policies and procedures on such varied topics as Student Conduct 
on Busses, School Committee Member Ethics, and Student Absences (Voluntary). 

2. Instituted computer education throughout the system. 

3. Computerized business operations and the budget process. 

4. Expanded the testing program system-wide. 

5. Expanded the high school library into a larger media center. 

6. Awarded diplomas to 132 seniors and welcomed 115 youngsters into Grade 1. 

****** 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

The primary task of all public schools is the education of society's youth for 
the benefit of both society and the students. Most people agree that to accom- 
plish this task there are certain primary subjects which must be mastered. Among 
these subjects are reading, writing, mathematics, social studies, science and 
computer literacy. During the past few decades, schools have attempted to do all 
things for all parts of society and have, in the process, placed less emphasis on 
the most important tasks. Recent national reports have generated much discussion 
at the present time and the schools' goals are becoming clearer. Excellence in 
academic courses and in life skills has once again become the clearly stated pri- 
mary task of schools. 

The Ipswich Public Schools started two major projects during the last year which 
go to the heart of the matter. The first project is the improvement of instruc- 
tion. Instruction is the critical ingredient in the classroom. No element in 
our schools is more necessary to good education and long-term needs than great 

-51- 



teaching. The method that we are using is called "Mastery Learning" by Dr. 
Madeline Hunter, and seeks to accomplish only one thing: to make our teachers 
the very best that can possibly be. This program which incorporates latest re- 
search on effective teaching is designed to build on the strengths of our staff. 
The program has provided for the individual training of administrators and some 
teachers at conferences. There is also regular training of teachers after school 
once or twice each month. This training program for teaching has been the most 
important goal of the school system for the past year and probably will be for 
the next two years. The second goal identified by the School Committee, which is 
being actively pursued by the staff, is the improvement of writing. We have ini- 
tiated a writing program from the elementary grades through the high school. The 
program, although relatively inexpensive, is based upon the best research and is 
being introduced in other exemplary schools in the state. Training has been pro- 
vided to staff and will continue on an as-needed bas^s. A formal evaluation of 
the program by an outside evaluator will take place in the spring to identify 
what we have done well and also to identify any areas which need improvement for 
the following year. 

We believe that these two major programs, when coupled with the other ongoing ac- 
tivities, will move the Ipswich Schools one step closer to being the best. 

****** 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal 

The aura of conservatism prevails among students, parents, faculty and admini- 
stration. Our purpose at the high school, in conjunction with parents, is to 
provide a sound basic education, plus knowledge of our contemporary world. 

Our pupils have had added to their graduation requirements a proficiency program 
in computer literacy, i.e., a knowledge of what a computer is and how it assists 
in everyday existence. The school has received a well deserved boost during this 
academic year. We now have an excellent Media Center and Computer Room. This 
Center replaced a very inadequate library. 

The Media Center houses all of the schools print/non print materials. There are 
20,000 volumes, 300 pieces of audio visual materials, plus a well equipped video 
tape package. 

The computer room houses 17 Apple lie microcomputers, a Wang computer with 5 ter- 
minals and 64K storage capacity, plus two word processors. This hardware, in 
combination with several pieces of software, enables us to provide a varied pro- 
gram to all students. We have gone from a library of 1,792 square feet to a 
multi media center of 3 t 672 square feet. Students are now able to pursue courses 
in word processing, accounting, computer mathematics and introductory courses in 
computer use. 

Not to forsake the humanities, we have offered an Advance Placement course in 
English, this brings our AP offering to eight courses. Graduates from the busi- 
ness department now have entry level skills in computer usage and word proces- 
sing. 

Most of our graduates (75.4) pursue post high school education, 47.4% went to 
four year colleges, 15.9% to two year colleges and 12.1% to non college educa- 
tional institutions. 

American secondary education has been in the spotlight for the past decade and 
claims of the schools being less than good have created a national sense of anxi- 

-52- 



ety, frustration and a defensive reaction among educators. None of these can 
serve as a panacea to our programs in Education, nor can improvements be totally 
delegated to the schools. Parental direction of pupils is absolutely needed to 
assure a good education. 

Objectively viewed, Ipswich High School is in a very positive position relative 
to national and regional expectations of public secondary schools. Our testing 
programs have provided information indicating that our pupils are doing well, 
however, we still need improvement. 

****** 

RALPH C. WHIPPLE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Ronald Landman, Principal 

This year the Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School added 108 sixth grade students and 
157 seventh grade students to the 148 eighth grade students in changing from a 
junior high school to a middle school. The change included establishing four 
clusters of approximately 100 students. One four-member teacher team services 
each cluster for English, math, social studies and science. Two foreign language 
teachers and one reading teacher provide their respective subjects to the seventh 
and eighth grade students. All students receive physical education, home econom- 
ics, shop, music and art from the specialty teachers. 

The special needs program is comprised of four situations. The teachers work 
with students in regular classes, small-group classes, remedialing sessions and 
a self-contained classroom. The guidance counselors directly assist teachers in 
designing the most effective program for each student. 

One very important component to any middle school is the media center, formerly 
the library. However the addition of computers and audio-visual hardware/soft- 
ware makes this the center for learning remediation, enrichment and acceleration. 

The importance of this transition is that the Ipswich School System has its or- 
ganizational scheme for the future. All available enrollment projections confirm 
this scheme as most suitable to avail all students the essential resources. 

Thus the Middle School is not an end, but a vehicle for providing quality educa- 
tion. Consequently the educators, the community and students now must collec- 
tively design a future model. This is our responsibility. 

****** 

PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal 

Several exciting changes took place to extend and improve the sound educational 

program offered at Doyon School during 1983. The thirty-four staff members began 

the year serving over five hundred children,- ages 3 to 11, in grades pre school 

through six. Planning for the development of the Middle School and the departure 

of the sixth grade added to the excitement of the arrival of our first computers 
in May. 

In September the new school year began with three fewer staff and a smaller en- 
rollment due to the departure of the sixth graders. Our October 1st enrollment 
was four hundred and forty-five students - ninety-one kindergarteners required 
the formation of an additional class. 

Goals for our new year included increased learning in computer literacy, improv- 
ing general academic performance in the basic skills and making better use of in- 

-53- 



school time through more time on task and improved teaching skills. Particular 
emphasis was placed on writing skills development and a strong effort made to im- 
prove math performance. 

Regular staff meetings began to help staff become familiar with Mastery Learning 
techniques as developed by Madeline Hunter. 

Shortly after Thanksgiving, eight of our ten computers were stolen by scoundrels, 
putting a temporary halt to our growing skills with these new machines. 

The staff and students maintain high morale and an exciting "Esprit de Corps" be- 
cause of the splendid support of parents, the Friends of Doyon School, and the 
Townspeople of Ipswich. 

WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Daniel P. Wilson, Principal 

The Winthrop School now serves children from kindergarten through fifth grade. 
At the end of the 1982-83 school year, sixth grade students were transferred to 
the junior high school, as it was made a middle school. Students receive in- 
struction in English, math, social studies, science, spelling, art, physical edu- 
cation, and vocal and instrumental music. Also, a new computer literacy curricu- 
lum is being implemented for the first time this year for students in grades one 
through six. In addition, specialists work with students in the areas of library 
skills, special needs, speech, and a remedial reading and math program funded by 
Federal Chapter I. Students participate in a variety of enrichment activities 
such as field trips, concerts, spelling bees, after-school flag football and bas- 
ketball, and lessons in horticulture which are carried out with the help of gar- 
den club members. 

A new student conduct code was introduced in January and implemented throughout 
the year. This was accepted enthusiastically by parents, and students responded 
very positively to it. The staff has spent considerable time studying an im- 
provement of instruction model presented by Dr. Madeline Hunter. 

A number of changes were made in the physical plant. The front of the school was 
attractively landscaped with bushes and flowers. Donations of time and materials 
from several groups and individuals made this project possible. Excavating work 
was conducting on part of the playground behind the building to eliminate a dan- 
gerous embankment which was eroding badly. The Friends of Winthrop erected a 
large playground structure which students named "The Great Escape". Several 
worn-out exterior doors were replaced. Insulation was placed over some of the 
glass block windows in the gym and cafeteria to improve the appearance and energy 
efficiency of the building. The defective intercom and clock systems were re- 
placed and carpeting was installed in three rooms to reduce noise. 

****** 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis, Administrator 

Department goals addressed and accomplished during the 1982-83 school year were 
as follows: 

1 . To expand on cost efficient ways to transport special needs students during 
the 1983-84 school year. 

2. To develop computer literacy and abilities to operate and program Apple II 
computers by at least twelve elementary regular and special needs staff. 

-54- 



3. To expand the communication and mutual planning between classroom teachers 
and special needs staff. 

4. To develop and fund ongoing training programs. 

5. To expand the high school special needs language arts (English) course 
offering to include specific goals and objectives. 

When a three-year lease with a private contractor expired in September of 1982, 
we began our own special needs transportation. It proved to be cost effective 
as we saved $20,070 from which we purchased a van for $11,060. 

****** 

SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 
Philip Kent , Constable 

1983 was a year of transition for the Shellfish Department. First, a new con- 
stable, Philip Kent, was appointed to fill the unexpired term of James Sotirop- 
oulos who resigned because of personal illness. Mr. Kent has been a deputy con- 
stable for over five years and has considerable experience with the clammers. 

Because of renovations to the Shellfish Treatment Plant in Newburyport, the river 
was not opened this past winter, forcing clammers to remain on the open area for 
the months of January through April which resulted in over -utilization of the 
open area. The river, even though not open, did not produce significant seed 
this past year and like the open area, suffers from over-use and a lack of clams 
for the future. 

The number of persons using the resource for commercial and recreational purposes 
has remained fairly constant, however, a greater number of non-residents have 
been digging in the river under our management plan. The recreational area in 
Eagle Hill Cove still remains a very popular place for clammmers using their 
catch for home purposes and many bushels of clams have been reseeded in this 
area. 

The overall future for clamming in Ipswich is not very positive. Most areas have 
been over-utilized during the past three years and no significant new seed has 
replaced the clams that have been removed. Mechanical or hydraulic methods of 
improving the surface soil are being discussed as ways to improve the flats and 
convert unproductive areas into ones that will support clams. 

Deputy Constables Anthony Thanos and Robert Kneeland have been very supportive by 
filling in on days off and checking clammers on the landings. 

****** 

350th ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 
Joseph Carpenter, Chairman 

The 350th Anniversary Committee has been actively meeting and planning during 
1983. There are currently 39 members on this committee, most of whom are 
serving on sub -commit tees for the various event as well. 

Two events are being held prior to the official opening of the celebration: 

they are the Ecumenical Service on June 10th and the Colonial Ball at Castle Hill 

on Friday, June 22nd - Colonial Dress required. 

The opening ceremonies will be held over the weekend of July 6th and 7th. The 
Fife and Drum Corps will be holding their Liberty Pole on Friday evening July 
6th and the Colonial Parade and official opening ceremonies will be held at 

-55- 



11:00 a.m. on July 7th. Other important activities include Celebrity Softball 
Games; Community Fair at Don Bosco on July 14th; Family Carnival at the High 
School; Firemen's Muster and Parade; Raft Race; Time Capsule; Band Concert and 
Fireworks on August 4th and the Finale Parade at 2:00 p.m. on August 5th. 

Many activities by other groups in Town have been planned in conjunction with the 
celebration; including Olde Ipswich Days, Marathon and Pancake Breakfast. 

The 350th Committee is selling T-Shirts and Commemorative Plaques to help defray 
some of the expenses of the celebration. These items are available at the pres- 
ent time and throughout the summer of 1984. 

Many important dignitaries have been invited to take part in the Opening Ceremo- 
nies of the Celebration and Congressman Nicholas Mavroules is the Honorary Chair- 
man. The Selectmen and Commissioner Winthrop, Representative Clark and Senator 
Buell are included on the Reception Committee. 

Booklets, including a calendar of events, will be available at Town Meeting. 

****** 

TOWN CLERK 

Isobel N. Coulombe 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past four years: 

1980 1981 1982 

Births 141 139 134 

Deaths 120 94 116 

Marriages 58 83 96 

There were 75 females and 67 males born to Ipswich residents in 1983. Of the 
total number of deaths recorded (46 males, 64 females), 99 were residents; the 
oldest resident was 99 years old, the youngest was seven months. In 31 mar- 
riages, one party was a non-resident; in 16, both were non-residents. 



DOG LICENSES 


1981 


1982 


1983 


Males 


527 


762 


668 


Females 


59 


82 


64 


Spayed Females 


448 


651 


606 


Kennels 


19 


21 


25 


Total 


1053 


1516 


1363 


SHELLFISH LICENSES & 


PERMITS 




1983 


Resident Yearly 




214 


Resident Family 






94 


Resident Commercial 






124 


Non-resident Yearly 






93 


Non-resident Daily 






43 


Non-resident Commercial 




7 


Non-resident Commercial Rack Tickets 


124 


"Over 60" Resident Recreational 




25 


Military Resident Recreational 




1 



725 = $21,375.50 

Town Elections: 

The Annual Meeting for the Election of Town Officers was held in accordance with 
the Warrant on Monday, April 11, 1983 from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The ballot 
box in Precinct 1 registered 443 ballots cast; in Precinct 2, 580; in Precinct 3, 
308; in Precinct 4, 509; for a total of 1,840 votes cast in the four precincts. 

-56- 



****** 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Charles C. Dalton 

1983 saw a substantial increase in the incidence of serious litigation against 
the Town in cases with a potentially serious impact on the quality of life of the 
residents of the Town for decades into the future. The Board of Health was sued 
in Superior Court by the developer of Heartbreak Hill alleging that the Board's 
long standing policy of limiting percolation tests to March and April of each 
year was a violation of the developer's constitutional rights; unrestricted per- 
colation tests, damages, and legal fees are being sought by the developer. 

A civil rights suit was filed in the Federal District Court against the Town by 
the owners of lots ineligible for building permits because they are not large 
enough to comply with the present Zoning By-Law, although they were of adequate 
size prior to 1977. Losing this case would have the effect of rendering at least 
200 presently unbuildable lots in Town eligible for the construction of single 
family homes. The Plaintiffs in this case are also asking the court for substan- 
tial damages and legal fees. 

Both of these cases are being vigorously contested by the Town. 

1983 also saw substantial litigation at the administrative and judicial levels 
between the Town and the Fire Department Union, most of which were finally re- 
solved in favor of the Town. 

Serious civil rights and other charges against the Town and against various mem- 
bers of our Police Department were finally disposed of in 1983 in the Federal 
District Court , the Court of Appeals , and the Massachusetts Superior Court and 
Appeals Court, all in favor of the Town and the police officers. 

Two significant parcels of" real estate - the Bur ley School and the Shat swell 
School - were sold by the Town for residential development. The discretion of 
the Sewer Commissioners to deny developers the right to utilize public sewerage 
was legally challenged in a case which is currently pending. 

****** 

TREASURER-COLLECTOR 
George C. Mourikas 

The following bills were committed from the Assessor's Office for collection: 
Real Estate, Personal Property, Farm Animal Excise, Boat Excise and Motor 
Vehicle Excise. 

A schedule of receipts was rendered to the Town Accountant monthly. 

A record of Trust Fund transactions was maintained. 

All disbursements, both Town and School were processed through this office, and 
all receipts were deposited and faithfully recorded. 

We have implemented Real Estate, Personal Property, and Water Collections with 
direct line terminal to a computer. Eventually, all other functions in the 
Treasurer-Collector's Office will be streamlined into the terminal. 

Through the diligent efforts of our staff, we have a Free Cash in the amount of 
$1,226,188.15 as of January 31, 1984. 

-57- 



****** 

VETERANS* SERVICES 

Lawrence H. Jordan, Director 

I hereby submit to the residents of the Town of Ipswich this financial report 
for the calendar year 1983. Chapter 115 of the Massachusetts General Laws, as 
amended, provides for immediate relief from hardships to Veterans and their de- 
pendents who qualify for entitlements under the directives set forth by the 
office of the Commissioner and within the guidelines of the law. During the cal- 
endar year 1983, there was a total of 181 cases processed under this program 
which cost approximately $73,000; 50% of this expenditure will be returned by the 
Commonwealth . 

The Federal benefits processed by this Department are paid directly to those vet- 
erans who are eligible to receive such assistance. Over 90% of our activity 
stems from the Federal program. In the Town of Ipswich, approximately 1700 vet- 
erans and their dependents received $1,500,000 from the Veterans Administration. 
The community does not contribute to these benefits. 

****** 

WATER/SEWER DEPARTMENTS 
James E. Chase, Engineer 

Water Division 

Gilbert J. Elliott, Foreman 

The following extensions to our distribution system were added in 1983: 

Seaview Road 8" CLDI - 535 Feet 

Kimball Street 10" CLDI - 125 Feet 

Bush Hill Road 8" CLDI - 625 Feet 

Colonial Drive 8" CLDI - 880 Feet 

A Town-wide leak detection survey was conducted. All leaks detected, with one 
exception, have been corrected. 

Town Meeting approved a feasibility study for a water filtration plant using Dow 
Brook & Bull Brook waters. Recommendations are expected at the 1984 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

New Meters Installed 
Meters Replaced 
Services Turned Off 
Services Turned On 
New Services 
Services Discontinued 
Hydrants Installed 
Hydrants Replaced 
New Water Mains Installed 
Total Length of Mains 

Water Services 
Metered Services 
Unmet ered Services 
Summer Services 



1981 


1982 




1983 


63 




26 


47 


31 




59 


73 


85 




76 


85 


101 




82 


103 


48 




26 


33 










1 


10 




5 


4 


2 




2 


3 


4,620' 


2, 


,800' 


2,165' 


404,340' 


407 , 


,140' 


409,305' 


3,464 


3,490 


3,538 


71 




71 


76 


84 




84 


84 



-58- 



Water Usage 








Dow's Reservoir 


141,548,000 


155,828,000 


139,212,000 


Brown's Well 


96,391,000 


49,559,000 


70,665,000 


Winthrop Wells 


42,079,000 


20,237,000 


52,464,000 


Mile Lane Well 


20,484,000 


15,855,000 


18,413,000 


Essex Road Well 


27,700,000 


6,352,000 


19,461,000 


Fellow's Road Well 





38,587,000 


37,131,000 


Total Water Usage 


328,202,000 


286,418,000 


337,346,000 


Highest Day: 5/27/81 


1,842,000 






Highest Day: 7/13/82 




1,605,000 




Highest Day: 7/11/83 






2,173,700 


Sewer Division 









James J. Tebo, Chief Operator 

The following extensions to our sewer collection system were added in 1983: 

Bush Hill Road 8" PVC - 235 Feet 

Bush Hill Road 8" CLDI - 295 Feet 

Oakhurst Avenue 8" PVC - 555 Feet 

Colonial Drive 8" PVC - 155 Feet 

A major Sewer Force Main break on Jeffrey's Neck Road necessitated bypassing 3.5 
million gallons of chlorinated raw sewage into the Ipswich River while repairs 
were effected. 

Plans for construction of sewer mains to service Spring Street and Highland 

Avenue were completed. Construction is expected in Spring 1984. 

High levels of performance continued to be maintained at our Wastewater Treatment 
Facility. 

1981 1982 1983 



Sewage Treated Daily 

(Average Gallons) 747,000 858,000 1,016,000 

Total Sewage Treated 

(Gallons) 272,626,000 313,455,000 371,039,000 

Highest Daily Flow: 2/25/81 2,536,000 

Highest Daily Flow: 6/05/82 2,899,000 

Highest Daily Flow: 3/19/83 2,942,000 

Total Precipitation (Inches) 28.16 54.18 67.73 

Highest Daily Prec. 8/05/81 3-10 

Highest Daily Prec. 6/05/82 2.80 

Highest Daily Prec. 11/24/83 3-30 

Treatment 

Average Influent Suspended 

Solids mgl 99 92 93 

Average Effluent Suspended 

Solids mgl 
Average percent Removal, S.S. 
Average Influent BOD5 mgl 
Average Effluent BOD5 mgl 
Average Percent Removal BOD5 
Average Effluent pH 



-59- 



3.0 


4.2 


3.5 


97 


95 


96 


105 


101 


82 


5.0 


4.7 


4.7 


95 


95 


94 


6.9 


6.7 


6.7 



,332,300 


1,700,700 


1,681,200 


2.8 


2.4 


2.4 


289,900 


293,457 


342,371 


12.5 


11.9 


11.3 



62,598 
27,931 


82,392 
30,450 


93,924 
37,282 


72 
1,355 


23 
1,378 


26 
1,404 


****** 







Sludge Dewatering 
Digested Sludge to Vacuum 

Filters (Gallons) 
Average Digested Sludge 

Percent Solids 
Vacuum Filter Sludge Cake to 

Disposal (Pounds) 
Average Vacuum Filter Sludge 

Cake % Solids 

Chemicals 

Disinfection: Total Chlorine 

(Pounds) 10,177 8,336 8,002 

Sludge Dewatering: 

Lime (Pounds) 

Ferric Chloride (Pounds) 

Collection System 
New Sewer Connections 
Total Sewer Connections 



WATER SUPPLY COMMITTEE 
James R. Engel, Chairman 

Two major issues presented at the Spring 1 983 Town Meeting were the Aquifer Pro- 
tection Zoning By-Law changes and a proposal for the preliminary design of a 
water treatment facility for Dow Brook and Bull Brook watersheds. The Water 
Supply Committee played a large role in the zoning issue and provided the major 
thrust behind the filtration facility proposal. 

In conjunction with other boards and committees, but primarily with the Planning 
Board, work was completed on the engineering study which provided the technical 
basis for the establishment of Water District overlay zones in Ipswich. The 
final result was the adoption of these zoning districts by the Town Meeting. 

The Water Supply Committee recommended to the 1983 Town Meeting the pursuit of a 
water treatment facility for the Dow Brook and Bull Brook watersheds as the most 
appropriate way to address simultaneously the improvement of water quality and 
the increase of water quantity in the Town. This was agreed to by the Town in 
the form of an authorization to spend $75,000 for a preliminary design/feasibili- 
ty study. A good part of the Committee's activity through the year following 
this Town Meeting action was in the form of assistance to the Town Manager in the 
preparation of the project statement of work, solicitation and evaluation of pro- 
posals, and contractor selection recommendations to the Board of Water Commis- 
sioners (Selectmen). The Water Supply Committee has provided the major monitor- 
ing function during the conduct of the study. Town Meeting 1984 will be asked to 
vote on authorizing funding for the completion of the detailed design as well as 
for construction of the treatment facility. 

The Committee continued to monitor activity on the Ipswich-sponsored amendment to 
Chapter 767, the reservoir site funding legislation. Although no progress was 
made on the particular bill filed in behalf of the Town of Ipswich, legislation 
very similar in wording was passed and signed into law late in the legislative 
year. The Water Supply Committee will be reviewing this legislation during the 
coming year to evaluate its potential benefit to the Town. 

****** 



-60- 



WATERWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
George C. Scott, Jr., Chairman 

Mooring Permits were the principal concern of this Committee during 1983, and 
the results look promising for 1984. 

The Mooring Permit application requests information to identify a boat and its 
owner, as well as information about the mooring system. The information received 
on the Mooring Permit, as well as the mooring location, and mooring system, have 
to be approved by the Harbormaster. A Mooring Permit can be denied if: the in- 
formation is incomplete; the mooring system is inadequate; excise taxes are not 
paid, or a boat is known to have been moored without a permit the preceding year. 

The Mooring Permit greatly assists the Town Assessor to issue boat excise taxes; 
and in the last three years, boat excise tax collections have increased more than 
threefold. This increase in boat excise taxes will result in an increased Har- 
bormaster budget and improved presence and policing along the waterways. 

In August, a proposition to again dredge the Ipswich River was brought up. The 
Selectmen, (with the advice of this Committee, the Great Neck and Little Neck 
Associations, along with many other residents) refused to take measures to in- 
volve the Town in such an adventure because of the restrictions and conditions 
required if Federal funds are used. Also, citizens were concerned about the 
changes to the area resulting from river dredging and the creation of a mooring 
basin. 

Take our advise, "Get a Mooring Permit ... .and avoid the problems that will be 
encountered if you moor your boat without a Mooring Permit!" 

WHITTIER REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 
Frank Scanzani, Whittier Representative 

Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School is entering its eleventh year. 
To date, we have graduated 1,842 students from a regular day school program and 
511 students from our post secondary courses. Whittier Regional' s goal is to 
train students for profitable employment and to provide social skills that will 
carry them through life as productive employees and concerned and knowledgeable 
participants within their communities. 

Whittier has just expanded its curriculum offerings by the recent opening of a 
Whittier Branch of the Family Mutual Savings Bank. It was built by Whittier 
students. It has been equipped by the Family Mutual Savings Bank, the Mosler 
Safe Company, and Distribution Associates, Inc. It has added one more curriculum 
offering to the students at the school and its opening has been enthusiastically 
received by the students and staff. 

Whittier has recently been awarded a grant of $124,101 of federal monies which 
are administered by the state. This grant will be matched by budgeted monies to 
offer education in Data Processing and Electronics to one hundred adults. These 
monies will also be used to upgrade our facility and equipment in Electronics and 
Data Processing to the return of the State of the Art. 

The enrollment for the Evening School from Ipswich for the 1982 Fall Semester 
was 19 students. 

The October 01, 1982 Day School enrollment from Ipswich was: 

Grade 9 14 Boys 6 Girls 

-61- 



Grade 10 


8 Boys 


9 Girls 




Grade 11 


6 Boys 


9 Girls 




Grade 12 


12 Boys 


4 Girls : 


= Total 68 



Post Secondary = 2; 1983 Graduates = 15. 

The cost to the Town of Ipswich for the school year 1982-1983 was $102,667. 

****** 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Allen G. Swan, Chairman 

The Zoning Board of Appeals celebrated the 25th anniversary of its formation in 
calendar year 1983. During the year, the Board received 73 petitions, four of 
which were withdrawn and six of which were dismissed. Of the remaining peti- 
tions, on which full hearings were held, 13 were requests for variances, of 
which four were granted; 45 were requests for special permits, of which 43 were 
granted; and five were appeals from decisions of the building inspector, three 
of which were affirmed and two of which were reversed. The Board held 60 full 
hearings, thus setting a new record; the previous record was 52, set in 1981. 

The Board continues to be bound by its statutory obligation to apply the stan- 
dards of the State Zoning Act, including the extremely strict standards for the 
granting of variances from the provisions of the Town Zoning By-Law. During its 
quarter century of existence, the Board has noted that despite one redrafting of 
the State Zoning Act (1975) and two of the Town Zoning By-Laws (1970 and 1977), 
both the Commonwealth and the Town have chosen not to relax those standards. 
Accordingly, requests for variances have been denied many more times than they 
have been granted. During the last five years, of 78 requests for variances, 
only 18 were granted. 

On January 20, 1983, the Board revised its Rules of Procedure in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40 A Sections 9 and 12. In order to save legal 
expenses for the Town, the Board in the summer of 1 983, voted unanimously to dis- 
continue further participation as a party in the action entitled Morse v McDon- 
ald's Corporation , pending in Superior Court. 

During the year, Allen G. Swan was re-appointed as a regular member for a five- 
year term, and John R. Verani and Jeffrey Simon were re-appointed as associate 
members, each for a one-year term. At its 1983 organizational meeting, the 
Board elected Allen G. Swan and James Theodosopoulos as Chairman and 
Vice-Chairman , respectively . 



-62- 



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-94- 



R.H. MANNING SCHOOL FUND 

Statement Of Receipts And Disbursements 
Unaudited For The Year Ended June 30, 1983 



Net Revenues 

Dividend Income 

Interest Income 
General & Administrative 

Office Expense 

Professional Fees 

Supplies For Ipswich School 

Safe Deposit Box Rental 

Net Income (Loss) 



Current Period 




Year-To-Date 




$ .00 


.0 


$ .00 


.0 


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100.0 


22,282.91 


100.0 


22,282.91 


100.0 


22,282.91 


100.0 


22.70 


0.1 


22.70 


0.1 


150.00 


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150.00 


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15,920.10 


71.4 


12.00 


0.1 


12.00 


0.1 


16,104.80 


72.3 


16,104.80 


72.3 


$ 6,178.11 


27.7 


$ 6,178.11 


27.7 



Balance Sheet 
Unaudited June 30, 1983 



Assets 

Current Assets 
Cash-FNB-NOW 
Cash-Ipswich Savings 
Cash -CD-Matures 8/27/82 
Cash-Essex Bank Savings 
20 Shares -Ipswich Coop 

Total Current Assets 

Fixed Assets 



6,985.93 


4.4 


623.49 


0.4 


146,603.27 


92.0 


1,182.13 


0.7 


4,000.00 


2.5 


159,394.82 


100.0 



Net Fixed Assets 


.00 
$159,394.82 


.0 


Total Assets 


100.0 


Liabilities & Equity 






Current Liabilities 






Total Current Liabilities 


$ .00 


.0 


Owners Equity 






Fund Balance 


153,216.71 


96.1 


Net Income (Loss) 


6,178.11 


3.9 


Total Owners' Equity 


159,394.82 


100.0 


Total Liabilities & Equity 


$159,394.82 


100.0 



****** 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 



$20,611.47 

1,908.18 
$22,519.65 

$22,519.65 



Balance on Hand January 01, 1983 
Income from Funds for Year 1983 as Follows: 
Interest: Ipswich Co-Operative Bank Money Market Certificate 

Balance on Hand January 01, 1984 as Follows: 
Ipswich Co-Operative Bank Money Market Certificate 

****** 

BROWN SCHOOL FUND 

A meeting of the Brown School Fund was convened at 9:30 a.m. on February 16, 1984 
by Chairman Gardiner A. Bolles. Also present were Howard Hill and James C. Lahar, 
Treasurer. The treasurer reported a balance in the fund of $7,985.60 as of 
December 31 , 1983. During the year the fund purchased two eletronic typewriters 
for the school system and agreed to assist in replacing computers stolen from the 
school in 1983. There being no other business, the meeting adjourned at 9:45 am. 

-95- 




FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Balance, July 1, 1982 $ 12,926.49 

Cash Received 184,126.67 

197,053.16 

Expenditures 190,022.67 

Balance, June 30, 1983 7,030.49 



Little Neck, valued at 2,030,560.00 

Buildings - Community Center & Barn 33,090.00 

Cash in First National Bank of Ipswich 7,030.49 

On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank 5,510.12 

Interest 291.37 5,801.49 

On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank 7,381.93 

Interest 213.82 7,595.75 

On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank 1,832.06 

Interest 54.42 1,886.48 

On Deposit - Ipswich Co-operative Bank 12,416.84 



Savings Certificates 

First National Bank of Ipswich 11,785.05 

Ipswich Savings Bank 21,233.31 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank 2, 116.88 



$ 2,133,516.29 



-96- 



SCHEDULE I 
CASH RECEIPTS 
July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983 

Rents & Land Taxes 

Taxes 

Late Payment Interest & Miscellaneous 



$ 70,250.56 

110,205.01 

3,671.10 

$ 184,126.67 



SCHEDULE A 



RECONCILIATION OF CASH BALANCE 



Balance, July 1, 1982 
Cash Receipts - Schedule I 

Expenditures - Schedule II 



$ 12,926.49 
184,126.67 
197,053.16 
190,022.67 

$ 7,030.49 




-97- 



SCHEDULE II 



EXPENDITURES 



July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983 



Taxes 

Town of Ipswich $147,911.39 

Repairs & Upkeep 

Water 17,729.07 

Wharf 720.00 

Community Center 1,410.00 

Playground 1,557.07 

Tree Work 2,302.00 

Hot Topping Roads 7,650.00 31,368.14 

Salaries 6c Expenses 

Salaries 3,900.00 

Transportation 1,800.00 

Police 1,945.00 

Legal 600.00 

Telephone 127.09 

Meetings & Dinners 265.05 

Office Supplies 333.00 

Insurance 1,773.00 10,743.14 

$190,022.67 



-98- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
REVENUE SHARING HANDICAPPED REGULATIONS 
This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section 51.55 of the 
Revenue Sharing Regulations, as published in the Federal Register on October 17, 
1983. Section 51.55 prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals be- 
cause of their handicapped status. 

The Town of Ipswich, Ipswich, Massachusetts advises the public, employees and job 
applicants that it does not discriminate on the basis of handicapped status in 
admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activi- 
ties. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or office) as the con- 
tact to coordinate efforts to comply with this requirement. Inquiries should be 
directed to: Name: George E. Howe 
Office: Town Manager 
Address: Town Hall, South Main Street 
Phone Number: 356-4848 

Hours: 8a.m. -7p.m. Mondays 

8a.m.. -4p.m. Tues-Thurs 
8a.m.-12noon Fridays 

****** 

TIPS FOR A HEALTHY SEPTIC SYSTEM 

Homeowners are advised that in order to ensure the proper functioning and long 
life of their septic systems, the systems should be properly maintained. Proper 
septic tank maintenance procedures should include, at a minimum, the following 
guidlines: 

1. Pump the septic tank regularly, at least every two years, more often in some 
areas or if indicated by periodic inspection. 

2. Minimize water uses in the home. Excess water will decrease the effective- 
ness of the septic tank and lead to flooding of the leaching area. Never 
empty basement sumps or other sources of clear water into the system. Run 
dishwashers and washing machines only with full loads. Fix leaky faucets 
and toilets promptly. 

3. Avoid disposal of the following substances in the system: 

• Coarse Organic Matter : vegetable trimmings, ground garbage, sanitary nap- 
kins, and coffee grounds will clog the septic tank with sludge and require 
frequent septic tank pumping. 

• Fats and Grease : Automotive oil should never be put into the septic sys- 
tem. Cooking oil and bacon grease, etc. may pass through the septic tank 
and clog the leaching area causing the system to back up. 

• Chemicals : Pesticides, disinfectants, acids, medicines, paint, paint 
thinner, etc., will kill the bacteria which decompose organic matter in 
the septic tank thereby causing increased sludge accumulation and more 
frequent pump-outs to keep the system operating properly. 

These guidelines are published in accordance with the recommendations of the 
Water Quality Management Plan for the Cape Ann Area, published by MAPC, May, 
1982. 



-99- 



52 .\t>5 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 2122 00162 130 3 




TIDE'S UP 

(Ipswich Chronicle Photo) 



J 




320 main street 
west newbury, ma 01985